Tag: 阿拉爱上海 验证普陀

QPR eyeing another Spurs defender – report

first_imgQPR – already linked with a move for Tottenham defender William Gallas – are also interested in Michael Dawson, the Daily Mail report.Rangers are said to be monitoring developments amid reports Dawson’s Spurs future is in doubt.The Mail also say QPR expect Joey Barton to complete a loan move to Marseille this week.Meanwhile, Victor Moses remains determined to move to Chelsea, according to The Sun.The Wigan forward is said to be keen to join the likes of Eden Hazard and Oscar at Stamford Bridge despite Latics chairman Dave Whelan’s attempts to hang on to him.A Wigan insider is quoted as saying: “Victor would be happy to do battle with the youngsters who have given Chelsea an exciting new look.“If Chelsea match Dave Whelan’s valuation of £9m, Victor will be on his way.”Sunderland manager Martin O’Neill is keen to capture Clint Dempsey if Liverpool continue to hesitate over signing him, the Daily Mirror say.Fulham star Dempsey wants to move to Anfield, but Liverpool boss Brendan Rodgers is yet to follow up his apparent interest with a firm bid.It is claimed that O’Neill will try to persuade the American to move to the Stadium of Light and hopes to speak to him this week.The Mail also suggest Sunderland want Dempsey – and say Fulham are considering signing former Arsenal striker Eduardo from Shakhtar Donetsk as well as Brescia’s Omar El Kaddouri.This page is regularly updated.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

The Warriors are not better without Kevin Durant. That said…

first_imgPORTLAND, Ore. — The Warriors are not better without Kevin Durant.Anyone who is pushing that narrative is, in essence, saying that the Warriors are better off with an amalgamation of minutes from Jonas Jerebko, Alfonzo McKinnie, and Shaun Livingston instead of 35-plus from perhaps the greatest scorer in NBA history.No offense to those reserves, who have played well in this series against the Blazers, but that’s a downright a laughable sentiment.Yet the Warriors are 5-0 since Durant went down …last_img

Warriors need Ky Bowman to mature quickly on the court, just like he did in real life

first_imgKy Bowman spent last Wednesday morning in Santa Cruz at training camp for the Warriors’ G League affiliate. Later that night, Stephen Curry’s broken left hand would thrust him into Golden State’s rotation.Curry will miss at least three months after surgery on his left hand. That, along with a growing list of injuries, from Klay Thompson (ACL) and Draymond Green (sprained index finger), to Kevon Looney (neuropathy) and Jacob Evans (adductor strain), has forced the Warriors organization to …last_img

What Would a Man Born Blind See With New Eyes?

first_imgThe Bible records an instance of a man born blind miraculously healed, who was immediately able to walk and recognize things.  Scientists had doubted whether a blind person suddenly able to see would understand the world of vision at all, or be able to make any sense of his new sense.  Then a real world case in 1959 provided an opportunity to learn, when Sidney Bradford, blind from infancy, at age 52 had an operation to restore his sight.  Investigator Richard Gregory in Nature1 records “the blind leading the sighted”— as Bradford’s eyes opened to the world of vision for the first timeWe found a cheerful, confident, middle-aged man who was willing to be investigated and who, so far as we could tell then or later, was truthful and honest.  But an initial shock nearly made us turn back with the disappointment that this must be a put-up job, or at least a Great Mistake: he correctly read the time on the clock in the ward.  Could he have guessed it?  Borrowing a nurse’s alarm clock, we set its hands to various positions, and he told us the times it showed.  Taking a large watch, which had no glass, from the top pocket of his jacket, he told its time by rapidly touching its hands, as he had done for many years.  So he could see immediately, from earlier touch experience.  At least for us, this was a turning point for understanding vision.Bradford also quickly learned to read and recognize objects, but had trouble initially with optical illusions and perspective.  Nevertheless, his sense of touch prepared him for the visual world.  Some scientists and philosophers had thought each sense acted separately, but this case showed there is “cross-modal transfer” between them.  Another case in 2000, Mike May, mirrored the experience of Bradford.  These findings were, to Gregory, “an eye-opening experience of the wonders of perception.”1Richard Gregory, “The blind leading the sighted,” Nature 430, 836 (19 August 2004); doi:10.1038/430836a.It becomes less an issue with these observations to consider how a blind man, miraculously healed, could have picked up his mat and walked, and made sense of the new world around him, as skeptics might complain.  Of course, any Miracle Worker capable of healing the blind could also heal the complete neural sensory and interpretive apparatus along with it.(Visited 61 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Will Evolutionary Psychology Be the First Darwinian Theory to Go?

first_imgEvolutionary psychologists are not getting much respect these days.  Some evolutionists, like Stephen Jay Gould and Richard Lewontin, criticized them for years.  Now, a new book came out against them and Science gave it a good review.1  To turn a Darwinian phrase, reviewer Johan J. Bolhuis said that the field of evolutionary psychology is undergoing negative selection pressure.    The book under review also turned a Darwinian phrase in its title, Evolutionary Psychology as Maladapted Psychology, by Robert C. Richardson, a philosopher of science.  Bolhuis, a member of the Behavioral Biology Group at Utrecht University, tied this maligned field to Charles Darwin right in the first sentence: “As we approach the 150th anniversary of the publication of On the Origin of Species, the theory of evolution is still not without controversy in the popular domain.”  It seemed logical to many to extend Darwin’s theory of evolution to cognition, “as Darwin himself did in The Descent of Man when he considered human characteristics such as morality or emotions to have been evolved.”    Both the author and reviewer accept evolution, and assent to the claim that our “psychological capacities are evolved traits.”  Nevertheless, they have problems seeing evolutionary psychology as a scientific enterprise.  Its flaws include:Blind reasoning:  It is questionable “whether particular human cognitive traits, such as language or human reasoning, can be seen as adaptations.”Tunnel vision:  Evolutionary psychologists tend to see everything in selectionist terms.  “The main problem with evolutionary psychology is that it usually does not consider alternative explanations but takes the assumption of adaptation through natural selection as given.”Blind zeal:  Enthusiasm by the proponents of evolutionary psychology outruns their science.  “Evolutionary psychologists often argue for their proposals with a zest and enthusiasm that seems to convey the message that we can only understand the human mind if we consider our evolutionary history.”Blind speculation:  The inability to find evidence for that history renders evolutionary psychology little more than storytelling.  For example, they say that human language evolved because of a functional demand in social groups.  Richardson, however, claims “we simply lack the historical evidence for a reconstruction of the evolution of human cognition.”On this last point, Bolhuis wound up for a knockout punch:Richardson rightly suggests that paleontologists are unlikely to unearth the evidence that can inform us about the social structure of our ancestral communities.  I think one can go a step further.  Even if we would be able to muster the evidence needed for an evolutionary psychological analysis of human cognition, it would not tell us anything about our cognitive mechanisms.  The study of evolution is concerned with a historical reconstruction of traits.  It does not, and cannot, address the mechanisms that are involved in the human brain.  Those fall within the domains of neuroscience and cognitive psychology.  In that sense, evolutionary psychology will never succeed, because it attempts to explain mechanisms by appealing to the history of these mechanisms.  To use the author’s words, “We might as well explain the structure of orchids in terms of their beauty.”Bolhuis ranked this book as excellent.  Combining this book with David Buller’s 2005 critique Adapting Minds (see 04/28/2005), he said, “the two books are complementary, and together they constitute a formidable critique of evolutionary psychology.”  Richardson in particular, he said in conclusion, “shows very clearly that attempts at reconstruction of our cognitive history amount to little more than ‘speculation disguised as results.’”    Bolhuis joked that Richardson is piling on the “selection pressure” against evolutionary psychology.  Presumably, he meant that Richardson did it intelligently by design.1.  Johan J. Bolhuis, “Piling on the Selection Pressure,” Science, 6 June 2008: Vol. 320. no. 5881, p. 1293, DOI: 10.1126/science.1157403.This is great.  Evolutionists are getting bold enough to criticize evolutionary psychologists in a pro-evolutionary science journal.  Progress is being made.    Now, all we have to do is point out to these people that the evolutionary biologists commit the same errors: assuming that adaptation implies evolution, refusing to consider alternative explanations, propounding their faith with zest and enthusiasm instead of evidence, telling stories about an inaccessible history, and disguising speculation as results.  What’s the difference?    If the evolutionists continue to work up the nerve to falsify each other, the whole Darwin castle might implode without an attack from outside.  Future archaeologists can study the ruins and help students learn from history that bad ideas eventually collapse from within.  Maybe the Darwin Bicentennial will turn out to be a moment of silence.(Visited 33 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Life Masters Physics

first_imgLiving things, especially cells, have mastered the forces of advanced physics in ingenious ways.  This ingenuity sometimes inspires physicists to try to copy it.  Here are some recent examples:Photosynthesis and quantum mechanics:  Nature reported that plants take advantage of quantum mechanics in photosynthesis.1  “The photosynthetic apparatus of cryptophyte algae is odd – its pigments are farther apart than is expected for efficient functioning.  A study into how this apparatus works so well finds quantum effects at play.”  Grondelle and Novoderezhkin continued, showing that plants exceed humans at this skill:It is common knowledge that plants, algae and certain bacteria use photosynthesis to convert solar energy into a form that can be used by the organisms to live and reproduce.  But what is less well known is that the efficiency of photosynthesis might depend in part on quantum-mechanical processes.  On page 644 of this issue, Collini et al.2 report evidence suggesting that a process known as quantum coherence ‘wires’ together distant molecules in the light-harvesting apparatus of marine cryptophyte algae.  This is the first time that this phenomenon has been observed in photosynthetic proteins at room temperature, rather than at much lower temperatures, bolstering the idea that quantum coherence influences light harvesting in vivo.Collini et al appeared surprised by their discovery: “Intriguingly, recent work has documented that light-absorbing molecules in some photosynthetic proteins capture and transfer energy according to quantum-mechanical probability laws instead of classical laws at temperatures up to 180 K,” they said.  “This contrasts with the long-held view that long-range quantum coherence between molecules cannot be sustained in complex biological systems, even at low temperatures.”  The plants’ ability to use “counter-intuitive design” employ quantum mechanical laws boosts the efficiency of light harvesting.  Grondelle and Novoderezhkin titled their article, “Quantum design for a light trap.”Smart grid technology:  Continuing on the theme of photosynthesis, a commentary in PNAS by David M. Kramer (Washington State U)3 describes how plants and other phototrophs (light-loving organisms) employ a “smart grid” system to dissipate excess energy and prevent damage:To deal with the Promethean consequences of harvesting light, phototrophs have evolved a photonic “smart grid” that balances the delivery of light energy to its two photosystems—photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII)—to prevent overexcitation and subsequent production of reactive oxygen species.  Like human-engineered electrical systems, the photonic smart grid can regulate energy transfer at several levels.  Unlike its engineered counterparts that have controllable power plants, phototrophs cannot down-regulate the sun.  Instead, when light capture exceeds the capacity of the system to process it, it must be dissipated or rerouted to avoid photodamage.  Chloroplasts deal with this problem by adjusting the properties of the photosynthetic antennae under photodamaging conditions.Kramer went on to describe how the power plant has a fail-safe mechanism.  The default state of the conformation of molecules in the photosystem is probably in the quenched mode – the safe mode.  “In this way, several different stimuli can result in similar down-regulation of the photonic smart grid.”Adhesion by cohesion:  We know that post-it notes work by creating cohesive forces with tiny droplets on paper.  Beetles employ a similar trick to stick to leaves.  They are so good at it, they can cling to leaves with a force 100 times their own weight, and then instantly detach themselves.  They achieve this by controlling thousands of tiny liquid droplets in their feet.  The adhesion created by surface tension in any one drop is small, but the large number of droplet contacts adds up.    Inspired by the success of the beetles, engineers at Cornell, with funding from the National Science Foundation and DARPA, have created a prototype adhesive that works on the same principle.  It controls the droplets with electric fields.  By reversing the fields, it can detach the device easily.  Their main problem is figuring out how to keep the droplets from coalescing, but they are making progress.  Science Daily reported that their palm-size device that employs water surface tension might make it possible for future Spider-man mimics to walk on walls.Acoustical nanomechanics:  “NASA Studies Nanomechanics of Inner Ear,” announced PhysOrg.  We often take our balance for granted, but it depends on sophisticated responses of tiny hair cells to the environment (see also a second PhysOrg article on this subject).  But how do the hair cells maintain enhanced sensitivity to very small movements without being overwhelmed by large movements?  The article describes how the amplifier can be instantly switched on or off by the organism.The inner ear organs are designed and precisely attuned to changes in the environment: for the hearing organ, a change in the sound pressure, such as caused by a car horn, can deform the ear drum and rapidly lead to the recognition and location of the sound.  For the balance organ, movement of the head, such as unexpectedly stepping off the curb, is sensed and rapidly leads to motor reflexes to maintain equilibrium.  The more sensitive our ability is to detect these changes, the more acute our sensation.  This remarkable tuning and amplification to detect the slightest stimuli, allows us to adjust our posture.NASA wants to understand these mechanisms so as to help astronauts avoid vertigo in space.  They are studying the hair cells in toadfish.  “Fossil evidence, dating from at least the Devonian Period 400 million years ago, shows that the elaborate sensory structures used to sense the organism’s movement are remarkably conserved among vertebrata.  The results demonstrate an active process in the hair cells of an ancient bony fish, thus suggesting that the mechanism is ancestral, and may underlie the broad appearance of active hair cell processes in amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, including humans.”  For a picture of one of the hair cells, see Science Daily.Cilia got rhythm:  A paper in Nature last month tackled the problem of how cilia and flagella beat with regular oscillations.4  To understand it, the researchers came up with a mathematical model that employed “opposed motors and springs.”  In particular, they studied the oscillation of the flagellum in sperm cells to come up with a “sperm equation.”  This excerpt sounds like something out of an engineering textbook:Any oscillation can be described as a sum of sinusoidal oscillations of increasing frequency, called Fourier modes; sideways oscillations can be described by the temporal Fourier modes of tangent angles.  Power-spectrum analysis showed that experimentally observed oscillations in tangent angles were well approximated using only the first (fundamental) Fourier mode, so the sperm equation could be analytically solved using values of this mode.  Tangent angles quantify the curvature of the axoneme at a given position, and the curvature is geometrically related to the sliding distance between doublets at that position.  The sperm equation thus relates time-dependent angular movement at each position to the extent and rate of inter-doublet sliding at that position, and to the local forces that either oppose or promote further sliding.    The model contains two adjustable parameters – stiffness and friction of the active material inside the axoneme that deforms and exerts force during bending.  It also contains several fixed parameters that J�licher and colleagues independently measured and fed into the equation.  These include the hydrodynamic drag of the moving flagellum and its ordinary stiffness, both of which oppose active deformation, and the beat frequency.  The authors obtained an excellent fit to the data, with both internal stiffness and friction taking the negative values expected for an active material.  Importantly, a microscopic model of dynein behaviour, incorporating the force-dependent detachment concept illustrated in Figure 2, predicted negative values for stiffness and friction similar to those obtained by fitting the sperm equation.The authors went on to describe physics concepts like beat frequency, force-detachment relationships, piston-like movement of doublets at the base of the cilia, and sliding friction.  Your life depended on a sperm cell understanding the physics of beating its way to an egg cell – and still depends on trillions of other cilia and flagella being good physicists in the cells of your body today.Bacterial flagellar switch:  A paper in Science discussed how the flagella of a bacteria can cooperate by using a stochastic switch.5  Several of the authors work in the Department of Physics at Oxford – not just the biology department.  “The elements of protein signaling networks are often complexes that change their activity in response to binding specific ligands,” their paper began.  “Multisubunit protein complexes often show cooperativity, with either binding or activity showing a switchlike sigmoidal dependence upon ligand concentration.”    The authors introduced the concept of “conformational spread” to explain the switching behavior between clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) rotation.  The description went on to discuss physical properties of the system: elasticity, a two-state Poisson process, stochastic coupling, and more.  The fact that these cellular machines can be described with the tools of mechanics not only emphasizes the physics in biophysics, but shows how human engineers envy the techniques that living things have mastered.Thermodynamics: Maxwell’s demon found:  The 19th-century physicist James Clerk Maxwell knew that entropy must increase in a system, but envisioned a way to overcome it: putting an intelligent selector in the system.  A “demon” could, in principle, isolate hot and cold molecules into different compartments, for instance.  PNAS reported that bacteria could be employed to harness random Brownian motion to turn gears.6The laws of thermodynamics prohibit extraction of useful work from the Brownian motion of molecules or particles in systems at equilibrium (nonexistence of a perpetuum mobile of the second kind or Maxwell demon).  When, however, such randomly moving objects interact with certain types of time-varying external potentials or with asymmetric geometrical obstacles under nonequilibrium conditions, their motions can be “rectified” and made directional.  This phenomenon, first considered by Smoluchowski and then analyzed in detail by Feynman, underlies the operation of so-called Brownian ratchets and motors.  The examples of biological “Brownian motors” include kinesin and myosin proteins converting chemical energy into directed motion on microtubules, and bacteria propelling themselves in viscous fluid owing to the “asymmetry”/chirality of flagellar rotation.The authors suggest that human engineers could employee flagella as Maxwell demons to turn nanoscopic gears.  It should be noted that all the instances they listed of Brownian ratchets are found in living systems or were produced by human engineers.Network engineering:  To build a better distribution network, make like a leaf.  PhysOrg announced that “Leaf veins inspire a new model for distribution networks.” Following the straight and narrow may be good moral advice, but it’s not a great design principle for a distribution network.  In new research, a team of biophysicists describe a complex netting of interconnected looping veins that evolution devised to distribute water in leaves.  The work, which bucks decades of thinking, may compel engineers to revisit some common assumptions that have informed the building of many human-built distribution networks.The netted patterns seen in leaves may not only be the most efficient way to get cargo from here to there; it may also provide the best safety net.  The “tree network” most commonly deployed lacks the redundancy of leaf networks.  “By contrast, in the leaves of most complex plants, evolution has devised a system to distribute water that is more supple in at least two key ways,” responding to fluctuating demand and re-routing around damaged parts of the network.  Videos in the article show how water is distributed in different kinds of leaves.  The article also pointed out that the loopy network design is also found in corals and insect wings.  “These findings could seriously shake things up,” a researcher said.  “People will have to take another look at how they design these kinds of systems.”  One of the researchers is further studying how the design handles fluctuating loads, “guided by nature’s own solution in the leaf.”The last entry talked about evolution numerous times: e.g., “evolution has devised a system” to do this or that, personifying evolution as some kind of engineer directing mutations toward a goal – an invalid notion in evolutionary theory.  As evidence, the article pointed to the ginkgo tree as a “primitive” (less evolved) plant with a simpler distribution of veins.  The article did not point explain, though, if its leaves were primitive, why it survived as a “living fossil” from ancient times all the way to the present, nor why corals, more ancient than ginkgo, already were outfitted with the more-advanced loop network design.1.  Grondelle and Novoderezhkin, “Photosynthesis: Quantum design for a light trap,” Nature 463, 614-615 (4 February 2010); doi:10.1038/463614a.2.  Collini et al, “Coherently wired light-harvesting in photosynthetic marine algae at ambient temperature,” Nature 463, 644-647 (4 February 2010); doi:10.1038/nature08811.3.  David M. Kramer, “The photonic ‘smart grid’ of the chloroplast in action,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, online February 5, 2010, doi: 10.1073/pnas.0914429107. 4.  T. J. Mitchison and H. M. Mitchison, “Cell biology: How cilia beat,” Nature 463, 308-309 (21 January 2010); doi:10.1038/463308a.5.  Bai, Branch et al, “Conformational Spread as a Mechanism for Cooperativity in the Bacterial Flagellar Switch,” Science, 5 February 2010: Vol. 327. no. 5966, pp. 685-689, DOI: 10.1126/science.1182105. 6.  Sokolov et al, “Swimming bacteria power microscopic gears,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, January 19, 2010 vol. 107 no. 3 969-974, 10.1073/pnas.0913015107.Don’t you get sick of the constant credit evolution gets for engineering design?  It’s sickening because it is nonsensical.  Evolution is not an engineer.  It is not a person.  It cannot organize parts for a goal; it is completely a random, instantaneous response to immediate circumstances.  Evolutionists commit two fallacies with sickening frequency.  For one, they use evolution as an active verb, saying, for instance, that hearts evolved to pump blood.  That phrase evolved to is the fallacy: it implies goal-directed behavior.  Only intelligent agents direct things toward functional goals.  Matter in motion does not – nor do non-sentient living things.  The apparent goal-directed behavior of bacteria toward a chemical gradient or moths toward a light is an artifact of their design.  The organisms are not “deciding” to set goals and work toward achieving them.  When you see evolved to, or find design and evolution in the same sentence, red flags should go up.  The science and philosophy referees need to call a foul.    The second fallacy evolutionists commit is kind of like the anthropic principle in cosmology: “If the universe were not finely tuned for life, we wouldn’t be here to worry about the question.”  That’s a dodge, not an explanation.  It doesn’t explain why the universe is designed or how it got that way; it is an appeal to a counterfactual.  Similarly, natural selection theory implies that if the bird did not evolve a wing, it wouldn’t be flying; if the plant did not employ quantum mechanical light traps, it wouldn’t be harvesting light.  It does not follow that the bird did evolve the wing.  That would be the logical consequence only if evolution is assumed a priori to be the only option.  But it is not.  One cannot assume what needs to be proved (circular reasoning).  Since our uniform experience is that intelligent agents do engineering, intelligent design should be the default inference to the best explanation for wings, hearts and photosynthetic systems.    The item about Maxwell’s demon (#7 above) is noteworthy.  As the Second Law of Thermodynamics is sometimes defined, all natural systems increase in entropy.  We know that humans can overcome the law of increasing entropy (locally and temporarily) by exerting goal-directed work, such as in harnessing the chemical energy of gasoline (from sunlight) in a well-designed piston engine.  Is that natural?  If humans are natural products of evolution, then everything they do should be defined as natural.  That would mean, however, that decreasing entropy is also natural – a contradiction with the Second Law of Thermodynamics, a law of nature if there ever was one.  And what about the real-world Maxwell demons like ATP synthase motors, flagella and other Brownian ratchets that harness random thermal energy to perform useful work?  Are they natural?  It is only by making the word natural a self-contradictory concept, or by abandoning the universality of laws of nature, that a materialist can deny intelligent causes are at work in the universe and played a role in its origin.(Visited 24 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

South Africa welcomes Nigeria’s economic growth

first_img8 April 2014 South Africa has welcomed the announcement that Nigeria, Africa’s most populous nation, is now the continent’s biggest economy, following a rebasing of the West African country’s gross domestic product (GDP). The World Bank, International Monetary Fund and African Development Bank have endorsed Nigeria’s rebased 2013 GDP figure of approximately US$509.9-billion. The figure, released by Nigeria’s National Bureau of Statistics on Sunday, makes South Africa the second-largest economy in Africa, with a 2013 rebased figure of US$370-billion. It also makes Nigeria, Africa’s biggest oil producer, the 26th largest economy in the world. South Africa’s National Treasury welcomed the announcement, saying it resonated with the country’s consistent call for more African economies to grow to their full potential, and gave “concrete expression to the fact that Africa is indeed rising”. “South Africa has been and will continue to benefit from faster economic growth in the rest of the continent,” the Treasury said in a statement on Monday, adding that the South African government and private sector “continue to play no small a part in the growth and development of the continent. “In Nigeria’s case, the wholesale and retail and the telecommunications sectors, the two largest components of the services sector, have big participation by South African firms who have played a big role in the growth and development of the two sectors. “This is a positive story of African countries contributing to re-shaping each other’s economies through increased investment.” Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Jon Miller, July 25

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Last Friday we got anywhere from a quarter to a little over a half inch on most of our fields. And the Monday before that we had about a half-inch also. Moisture-wise I think we have been some of the luckier ones in the state. Things really look just about as good as we could hope for at this point.Most of our corn is done pollinating. We have some early corn planted on April 18 and we pulled an ear at sweet corn stage already. It is progressing really well with the heat and moisture. It may be an early harvest.Most of the corn pollinated in the low to mid-80s range for temperature. We were maybe a little dry for a couple of days for pollination, but nothing severe.We brought all of the equipment back last Thursday for baling straw and called it quits. We should be between 96,000 and 97,000 bales of straw for the year, which was double what we did last year and it was tremendous. We had the weather to do it. A lot of times we’ll be baling almost until August and this year we were done last week with more bales.I am on the Trade Policy and Biotech team for the National Corn Growers Association and we had meetings last week in Washington, D.C. and the Corn Congress was after that. A good friend and good leader for Ohio, John Linder, got elected to the NCGA Board. He was the highest vote getter in the election. That is the first time ever that Ohio has had two on that board at one time. We have Anthony Bush and John Linder — both from Morrow County — on there now and Ohio should be proud of that. Ohio is well respected at the national level.It seems like there is a huge crop out there after hearing from people across the country. After talking to everyone, it may be tough for the markets to really rally much.last_img read more

NBA: Analyst Charles Barkley says it’s ‘stupid’ that Kyrie Irving wants to leave Cavs

first_imgKyrie Irving #2 of the Cleveland Cavaliers  (Jason Miller/Getty Images/AFP)NBA Hall of Famer Charles Barkley is not one to hold his tongue regarding issues in today’s NBA and he recently chimed in on Kyrie Irving’s supposed request to be traded from the Cleveland Cavaliers.READ: Cavs star Kyrie Irving reportedly requests tradeADVERTISEMENT Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Teenager upsets Nadal at Montreal Masters Was LeBron James’ tweet a shot at teammate Kyrie Irving?Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next NGCP on security risk: Chinese just technical advisers “When he was on a bad team and he was the man, I guarantee you that wasn’t a lot of fun for him,” he explained. “And now you want to leave the best player in the world. And listen, I hear all of this stuff about how LeBron casts a big shadow. He should cast a big shadow.”Barkley, meanwhile, certainly knows a thing or two about accepting a lesser role, as he joined fellow legends Hakeem Olajuwon and Clyde Drexler at the twilight of his career in the 1996-1997 season.Although Barkley acknowledges that at 25 Irving is still in his prime with his best days ahead of him, he further explained why winning a championship remains the most important thing.“You wanna share the glory. You wanna win. Right now, there’s only two, three, maybe four legitimate teams in the NBA,” he concluded. “If you’re not on one of those four or five teams, you’re really just wasting your time for seven months. So I don’t understand why you wouldn’t want to play with LeBron. Listen, I wanna play with LeBron now!”  Khristian Ibarrola /raRELATED STORY:ADVERTISEMENT DILG, PNP back suspension of classes during SEA Games View comments Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo The outspoken player-turned-analyst shared how baffled he was by the notion of Irving’s displeasure playing second fiddle to teammate LeBron James.“You want to be on a good team. You want to play with other great players. This notion where you want to be the man, I just think is so stupid,” he said during an interview on NBA TV, as relayed by Bleacher Report.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“If I got a chance to play with another great player, I want to do that. The objective is to win,” he said.The 1993 NBA MVP also recalled Irving’s early years with the Cavaliers while LeBron was still playing for the Miami Heat.center_img LATEST STORIES MOST READ Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’last_img read more

Should have handled Sachin differently in 2007 Cup: Chappell

first_imgFormer India coach Greg Chappell has revealed that his insistence on pushing Sachin Tendulkar down the batting order against his wish during the 2007 World Cup led to a “breakdown” of relations with the iconic cricketer.Just before the 2011 World Cup, Chappell, now an Australian selector, has broken his four-year-long silence on the issue which had caused an upheaval in Indian cricket.Chappell now says that faced with a similar scenario he would have handled Tendulkar differently and left it to the batsman to pick his own place in the order.In a book on Tendulkar titled SACH, written by noted sports scribe Gautam Bhattacharya, Chappell has recalled the entire spat but insisted that he and Tendulkar buried the hatchet within a few days of the controversy.”At the outset let me clarify I never ever doubted Sachin Tendulkar’s commitment to the side. The only time I talked about him was in relation to the team’s World Cup venture. If you talk about a breakdown in relations, that possibly happened only around this time. Basically we differed on his batting order in the West Indies,” Chappell said in an interview published in the book which is due to hit the stands this week.Chappell said the conditions in the West Indies demanded a power-hitter in the middle order and the choice was between Virender Sehwag and Tendulkar. Since Sehwag refused the offer to come down the order, Tendulkar was approached who agreed reluctantly.”It wasn’t just me alone. Rahul Dravid was also involved in the thinking which felt the matches were going to get decided in those middle overs and you needed the brilliance of either a Sachin or Sehwag to play in that position,” Chappell revealed.advertisement”Sehwag didn’t seem very keen. So we sat down with Sachin who in any case was the first priority. We put it down to him and he seemed reluctant. He thought top-of-the-order was the best place for him as it has always been.But we were still in the discussion as Rahul and myself were convinced no other batsman in the team would be able to do it. Sachin finally agreed. Next day he got back to Rahul.Though he made it known that he was not happy doing it. He felt that his reputation demanded two places higher in the order,” he recalled in the interview.In hindsight, Chappell said he would have given the same suggestions but would have allowed Tendulkar to decide.”…that experience has taught me a lesson. Today confronted with a similar situation I would still put the idea across to him and explain. But if he shows any kind of discomfort I won’t push. I would let him decide,” Chappell said.Soon after the debacle, Tendulkar gave an emotional interview to a daily in which he said his commitment to the team was questioned by Chappell but the Aussie said the two had a chat and parted ways amicably.”With Sachin, I later on had a face-to-face chat. There was an issue about a write-up which had come out in the Times of India. We spoke the next day and I would like to believe parted on good terms. As I said earlier the only disagreement we had was over his place in the batting order which now is a thing of the past,” Chappell said.The former Australian captain went on to say that he admires Tendulkar for the ease with which he handles expectations of over a billion fans in a cricket-mad country.”During my years as the Indian Coach how people vied for a minute’s attention from him irrespective of wherever he went! Emotionally and physically it must be very draining to cope up with that sort of attention day in and day out. But he has handled it remarkably well.”He must be the most singlehanded devotee cricket has ever seen. Cricket has taken up so much of his life that at times you would wonder what is he going to do once he gives up the game!” he said.Chappell reiterated that his decision to quit as India coach was made before the 2007 World Cup disaster and the reason was clash of ideas with the BCCI.”I had presented the BCCI my road-map for the project Commitment to Excellence and they approved it. Yet there was a clear philosophical clash as to which direction the Group needed to go. I for one wasn’t prepared to compromise. If I had conceded then there would be no fight,” he said.advertisement”But I wanted to remain true to my beliefs and cricketing thought’s bottom-line ? it wasn’t going anywhere and whatever I had set out to do remained unattainable. That is why I decided to quit which was much before the World Cup.”So to set the record straight once again Sachin’s statement in the press against me had nothing to do with my discontinuing as the coach. As I said earlier we had parted on good terms,” he added.- With PTI inputslast_img read more