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Real Estate Development vs. Climate Change

first_img Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago  Print This Post The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Journal, Loss Mitigation, News Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Subscribe Sign up for DS News Daily Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Previous: House-Flipping Hot Spots Next: Home Prices Remain High, Continue Yearly Growth Home / Daily Dose / Real Estate Development vs. Climate Change Share Save Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago About Author: Krista Franks Brock The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Related Articles Tagged with: climate change flooding Natural Disasters Video Spotlight Real Estate Development vs. Climate Change Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Krista Franks Brock is a professional writer and editor who has covered the mortgage banking and default servicing sectors since 2011. Previously, she served as managing editor of DS News and Southern Distinction, a regional lifestyle publication. Her work has appeared in a variety of print and online publications, including Consumers Digest, Dallas Style and Design, DS News and DSNews.com, MReport and theMReport.com. She holds degrees in journalism and art from the University of Georgia. July 31, 2018 1,940 Views climate change flooding Natural Disasters Video Spotlight 2018-07-31 Krista Franks Brock Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago After a small town in Maryland experienced what was considered a “1,000-year flood” twice within about two years, city officials had to consider how development is exacerbating the effects of climate change. As CNBC explains in the video below, “a combination of climate change and too much real estate development has turned water from an asset to a liability.”Having developed around its rivers, Ellicott City must now adapt to the changing climate that is increasing potential flooding and the feverish development that is preventing overflow from draining naturally. Take a look at the trials facing this small city, which may be a preview of more widespread problems in the decades to come.last_img read more

Petitioner Failed To Explain Any Reason For Leaving Husband: P & H HC Imposes Rs. 25K Costs On Wife For “Frivolous” Plea For Protection From Husband, In-Laws [Read Order]

first_imgNews UpdatesPetitioner Failed To Explain Any Reason For Leaving Husband: P & H HC Imposes Rs. 25K Costs On Wife For “Frivolous” Plea For Protection From Husband, In-Laws [Read Order] Mehal Jain14 Sep 2020 10:38 PMShare This – xThe Punjab and Haryana high court has imposed a cost of Rs 25,000 on a woman for failing to explain why she had left her husband against whom she had approached the Court apprehending threat to her life.The facts as pleaded in the writ petition before Justice Manoj Bajaj are that the petitioner no. 1-woman was married to the respondent in the year 2008 and two children were born out of…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Punjab and Haryana high court has imposed a cost of Rs 25,000 on a woman for failing to explain why she had left her husband against whom she had approached the Court apprehending threat to her life.The facts as pleaded in the writ petition before Justice Manoj Bajaj are that the petitioner no. 1-woman was married to the respondent in the year 2008 and two children were born out of this wedlock. Allegedly, the woman was dealt with cruelty by her husband and other members of her in-laws family. She gathered courage ten days back and left the matrimonial home with the help of another man (petitioner no. 2). According to the pleadings, the petitioner No.1 left the house as per her own will and is living at different places in the District Jhajjar, Haryana. The petitioners apprehended that the private respondents wouldcause harm to them, therefore, they had given representations to the police respectively. However, the representations had not been looked into so far and therefore, they have approached the Court for protection of their life and liberty.After hearing counsel for the petitioners, the Court found that the writ petition “does not contain any pleading muchless narration of a cause of action in favour of petitioner No.2 for filing petition along with petitioner No.1”.Considering the pleadings and submissions of the counsel, the Court was of the view that petitioner No.1 does not deserve any concession, “particularly, when she has failed to explain any reason for leaving the company of her husband”.Besides, the Single Judge noted that the petitioner No.1 has given the address of her matrimonial home in the petition, but has claimed that she is residing at different places in district Jhajjar. “During the course of hearing, it is not disputed by learned counsel that no complaint has ever been made by petitioner No.1 either against the husband or any of the other family members of the in-laws”, the bench added.The bench further observed that admittedly, the marriage is 12 years old and the children are also residing with the father. “It does not appeal to prudence that after leaving the matrimonial home, the petitioner No.1 has not contacted her parents, but chose to live alone at District Jhajjar”, remarked the bench, proceeding to state that except for the bald allegation that the respondent-husband treated the petitioner No.1 with cruelty, no supportive material has been placed on record by her.The Court found that not only the petition for protection is founded on frivolous grounds, but it also amounts to abuse of the process of law. “Apparently, the petitioner has not approached the Court with clean hands and has deliberately suppressed the material facts, therefore, this Court finds that she deserves to be saddled with costs”, the bench stated. Not finding any reason to exercise the extraordinary writ jurisdiction, the petition was dismissed with costs of Rs.25,000/- to be deposited by the woman in the Bar Council of Punjab and Haryana, COVID-19 Relief Fund.Click Here To Download Order[Read Order]Next Storylast_img read more

Images of Harlem, then and now

first_img Bey’s iconic “Harlem, U.S.A.” captures the moment in “A Woman and Two Boys Passing” (1978). Courtesy of Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago In “Young Man, West 127th Street” (2015), Bey captured the neighborhood transforming around the seated man. Courtesy of Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago Image © Dawoud Bey Bey’s “Boy on Skateboard” (2014) reflects the gentrification of the neighborhood. Courtesy of Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago Art of the self, but not just Other works are featured, including Felicia Megginson’s “Suspicious Eyes” (2008). Courtesy of the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York A portrait by Dawoud Bey, “A Man in a Bowler Hat” (1976), is on exhibit at the Cooper Gallery. Courtesy of Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago Nari Ward’s “Sugar Hill Smiles” (2014) is included in the exhibit.Courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong Photo: Whitney Brownecenter_img For photographer Dawoud Bey, activism and art have long been linked. Bey, whose portraits of Harlem form the centerpiece of the exhibit “Harlem: Found Ways” now at the Ethelbert Cooper Gallery of African and African American Art, first connected with his chosen visual medium through a protest.The year was 1969, and Bey, then a 16-year-old living in Queens, had heard of the controversy around the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “Harlem on My Mind” exhibition. The show, which contained no paintings or sculptures by African-American artists, was drawing protests and picket lines, and the socially conscious teen decided to check it out.“As it turned out,” Bey explained in a gallery talk, “on the day I got there, there was no demonstration. There was no picket line, so I got to go see the exhibition.”What he found was as powerful as any protest. Describing a “pivotal and transformative moment,” the artist recalled being in a Manhattan cultural institution, “seeing photographs of ordinary African-Americans in a museum, and seeing people looking at the photographs.”If that show turned Bey, who is also a musician, into a photographer, it also taught him what he didn’t want to do. Unlike the poorly conceived and patronizing Met show, Bey said last Wednesday, “I knew that I wanted to exhibit those photographs in the community, so people who were the subjects of the work would have access to the work and be part of the audience for those works.”The resulting show, “Harlem, U.S.A.,” compiled photographs made from 1975 to 1979 and was indeed first exhibited at the Studio Museum in Harlem. Related Many of these photographs are included in the Cooper show, which also includes works by Abigail DeVille, Glenn Ligon, Howard Tangye, Nari Ward, Kehinde Wiley, and selections from the Studio Museum’s Harlem Postcard project.Largely portraits, Bey’s photos from that first exhibition depict an established community. In some, like “A Man in a Bowler Hat,” the subjects face the camera directly. Self-possessed and self-aware, they present a dignified and timeless humanity. Others, like “A Woman and Two Boys Passing,” appear to be candids. Almost abstract, light and shadow are as elemental to the composition as the title characters in this photo, which captures one moment in time.That moment may soon be gone. Bey has since moved out of New York but retains ties to the area. During visits, he explained during his talk, he became “acutely aware” of how Harlem was changing, as gentrification remade the historically African-American area into something wealthier, whiter, and more generic.“I wanted — or needed — to make a work about that,” he explained. In 2014, he began walking the streets again, seeking his subjects and focus for a new series of photographs. The result, “Harlem Redux,” is a startlingly different body of work. In place of the small, intimate black-and-white portraits of “Harlem, U.S.A.,” the new photos, which have pride of place in the front of the Cooper Gallery, are monumentally large color prints. More striking still, they focus not on the people as much as the landscape of change. Construction sites and materials fill these prints with the yellow and orange of safety barriers, the green of a dumpster, or the mottled browns of water-damaged paper. The result is almost abstract — beautiful, but lacking the human touch of a living, breathing community.When people are pictured, they are anonymous, as if overwhelmed by the change around them, or seen only from the back, as in “Young Man, West 127th Street.”The young man is, explained Bey, the one unchanging point in this landscape. “He’s still sitting there like people always have,” said the artist, “even as the place transforms around him.”“Harlem: Found Ways” will be on view at the Ethelbert Cooper Gallery of African and African American Art, Hutchins Center, 102 Mount Auburn St., Cambridge, until July 15, open Tuesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed on the Fourth of July. Carrie Mae Weems speaks through images in Cooper Gallery exhibit last_img read more