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Rowe, Ramirez Crowned 2019 Cross Country Student-Athletes of the Year

first_img Name School Class Hometown GPA Major Jaron Hamilton Central Arkansas Sr. Grand Prairie, Texas 3.82 Exercise Science Women’s Cross Country All-Academic Second Team Katy Whiteoak Lamar Jr. Manchester, England 3.95 History Julie Emmerson* Lamar Gr. Kenilworth, Warwichshire, England 4.00 Kinesiology Colton Gates Abilene Christian So. Aurora, Colo. 4.00 Engineering Men’s Cross Country All-Academic Second Team Gracie Hyde Central Arkansas So. Benton, Ark. 4.00 Exercise Science Women’s Cross Country Student-Athlete of the Year: Kelsey Ramirez, Stephen F. AustinWomen’s Cross Country All-Academic First Team Alia Henderson UIW So. Bandera, Texas 4.00 Government Briahna Gerlach* Abilene Christian Jr. Gakona, Ala. 3.55 Social Work Kelsey Ramirez* Stephen F. Austin Sr. LaPorte, Texas 4.00 Kinesiology Austin Zirkel Sam Houston State So. Medina, Texas 3.88 Criminal Justice Name School Class Hometown GPA Major Carnley Graham Abilene Christian Sr. Prosper, Texas 3.90 Nursing Name School Class Hometown GPA Major Matt Arnold Lamar Gr. Surrey, England 3.66 Kinesiology Isaac Vargas A&M-Corpus Christi Jr. Levelland, Texas 3.80 Electrical Engineering Meredith Clayton Stephen F. Austin So. Brenham, Texas 4.00 Mathematics Jack Gooch* Lamar Gr. Cardiff, Wales 3.90 Business Administration Name School Class Hometown GPA Major Arina Kleshchukova* New Orleans Jr. Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan 3.67 Hotel, Restaurant & Tourism Administration Marek Spriestersbach A&M-Corpus Christi Sr. Oberneisen, Germany 3.94 Mechanical Engineering FRISCO, Texas – Lamar’s Jordan Rowe and Stephen F. Austin’s Kelsey Ramirez are the 2019 Southland Conference Cross Country Student-Athletes of the Year, the league announced Thursday. In addition to the individual award winners, Academic All-Conference teams were also announced. All Southland yearly award winners are presented by Ready Nutrition.Rowe capped an incredible season with an appearance at the 2019 NCAA Championship in Terre Haute, Ind. The graduate student from Frinton-On-Sea, Essex, England, began his 2019 postseason run with a first-place performance at the Southland Conference Championship, securing a First Team All-Conference selection and the league’s Athlete of the Year award along the way. Rowe then moved on to the NCAA South Central Regional meet where he took eighth place in the 10k event in Fayetteville, Ark. He went the distance and closed out his 2019 season at the NCAA Championships for the second-straight year, posting a 31:52.8 for an 86th-place finish. As a graduate student, Rowe is pursuing his degree in kinesiology and currently holds a 3.83 grade-point average (GPA).Ramirez claimed a runner-up finish at the 2019 Southland Championship, completing the 6k race with a time of 20:51.5 to push the Ladyjacks to a second-place team finish. The junior then followed up with a 20th-place performance at the NCAA South Central Regional Championship in Fayetteville, where she clocked in at 21:38.0 in the 6,000-meter event. Ramirez currently holds a perfect 4.0 GPA as a senior kinesiology major.Abilene Christian and Lamar lead the way on the men’s Academic All-Conference squads with three selections apiece, followed by Texas A&M-Corpus Christi with a pair of honorees. Central Arkansas and Sam Houston State each accounted for one selection to close out the roster.On the women’s side, four teams presented two selections apiece, including Abilene Christian, Central Arkansas, Lamar and Stephen F. Austin. UIW and New Orleans completed the women’s roster with one honoree each.There were a combined eight 4.0 GPAs among the men’s and women’s squads with two on the men’s side and six on the women’s side.Southland Conference All-Academic Teams are voted upon by a head coach, sports information director and academic/compliance staff member from each school. Student-Athletes of the Year are voted upon by an awards committee which consists of one administrator from each member school. Voting for one’s own athletes is not permitted.To be eligible for all-academic distinction, an athlete must hold a minimum 3.00 cumulative grade point average through the semester prior to the sport’s championship, completed at least one full academic year at the nominating school prior to the current season, and participated in at least 50 percent of the team’s competitions during the most recently completed season.Student-Athlete of the Year nominees must hold at least a 3.20 GPA and have completed at least two years of athletic competition at the nominating institution.First Team All-Conference athletes (top five finishers at the Southland Cross Country Championships) who meet all-academic nomination criteria are automatically named First Team All-Academic.Men’s Cross Country Student-Athlete of the Year: Jordan Rowe, Lamar Men’s Cross Country All-Academic First Team Erin Woodward Central Arkansas Sr. Little Rock, Ark. 4.00 Health Sciences – Physical Therapy Kevin Kipkosgei* Abilene Christian So. Eldoret, Kenya 4.00 Nursing Jordan Rowe* Lamar Gr. Frinton-On-Sea, Essex, England 3.83 Kinesiology Conner Miller Abilene Christian Jr. Carrollton, Texas 3.15 Financial Management * Automatic selection; 2019 First Team All-Conferencelast_img read more

Amargosa plan shifting into high gear

first_imgLANCASTER – Hoping to break ground early next year on a landmark retail and entertainment complex, city officials are scrambling to complete planning and environmental documents for the Amargosa Creek project by late summer. The goal is to set the stage for developers to create a signature center that will address calls by residents for more shopping and entertainment opportunities. Before that can happen, however, officials need to complete the specific plan, which guides the project’s development; an environmental impact report; and a financial analysis that will consider market viability and the cost of infrastructure improvements. City officials hope to complete the financial study in May, the EIR report in July and the specific plan in August. The documents will use as a starting point a design concept hammered out during a series of meetings with city officials and the public. The chosen concept features an east-west “Main Street” geared toward strolling shoppers that intersects with a north-south line of shops. The design concept features more than 775,000 square feet of shopping space, two possible locations for hotels, a main central plaza for community gatherings and a secondary plaza on the eastern end. The 150-acre project site is bounded roughly by Avenues K-8 and L and by Fifth and 10th streets west. The project area also includes about 40 acres for medical facilities. The earliest construction could begin is early 2008. City officials expect the shopping center to evolve over several years, much in the same way as the Antelope Valley Mall in Palmdale. james.skeen@dailynews (661) 267-5743160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! A draft environmental report is scheduled for completion by April 20. “It’s a pretty ambitious schedule,” said Brian Ludicke, Lancaster’s director of community development. “We’ve committed to the stakeholders and the council to this time frame.” One of the first steps in the EIR process is to hold a scoping meeting, which is scheduled for 6 to 8 Thursday night at City Hall, 44933 Fern Ave. “The scoping meeting is an opportunity for public agencies as well as the public itself to give us the topics that they think need to be studied as part of this EIR project,” Ludicke said. The public will have opportunities to provide input on the project at various stages, said Anne Aldrich, the city’s communications manager. After the scoping meeting, the next two opportunities for public comment will be a study session for the Planning Commission on March 12 and with the release of the draft EIR. last_img read more

A.V. crime-fighters are here to stay

first_imgPALMDALE – Antelope Valley deputies have been telling anyone who’ll listen that an unprecedented crime-fighting effort unleashed three weeks ago is part of an ongoing effort that won’t go away anytime soon. In a meeting last week of high-ranking Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department officials, the operation was given an official title suggesting they aren’t kidding. Law enforcement officials are now under instructions to call the effort the “Antelope Valley Crime-Fighting Initiative.” “This is going to be a long-term effort, and people are going to get used to hearing about it,” said Palmdale station Lt. Bobby Denham, who heads the operation. Denham said last week’s three-day saturation patrol in Palmdale produced 105 arrests – 27 for felonies and 78 on misdemeanor charges – and 74 citations. In three weeks since the initiative began, HIT deputies made 237 arrests. In last week’s HIT patrol, 14 gang members were arrested and 13 vehicles were seized, Denham said. He said it was not known if any of the gang members were “shot-callers” that law enforcement officials typically covet. A woman in possession of a brick of cocaine with a $4,000 estimated street value and $3,000 in cash was among 23 arrests made on drug charges. Denham said the operation will target a 10-square block location in an unspecified portion of the Antelope Valley this week. Denham said other components of the initiative, and the Partners for a Better Palmdale Program, which includes after-school programs, are essential, too. “When the community is involved, that’s when we see long-term positive results,” Denham said. gideon.rubin@dailynews.com (661) 267-7802160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! The name sends a message to the public that the program is ongoing, and that it features a layered strategy that also includes engaging the public, Denham said. Saturation and targeted patrols have produced more than 200 arrests since varying numbers of out-of-town High-Impact Team deputies began flooding the streets of Lancaster and Palmdale on March 20. Denham said the initiative will include the unincorporated regions of Littlerock, Lake Los Angeles and Quartz Hill. Sheriff’s deputies will conduct door-to-door surveys seeking public input starting this week. Deputies also will be gathering public input during a meeting starting at 9 a.m. Saturday on Fifth Street East and Avenue Q-3. Law enforcement officials will conduct a similar survey in Lancaster later this month, Denham said. last_img read more

GAA: ST EUNAN’S GAA CLUB NOTES

first_imgClub Notes – Naomh Adhamhnáin – 06.02.12This Sunday we will host the Donegal v Laois NFL Div. 1 game in O’Donnell Park, throw-in is at 1pm. All Stewards are asked to be at the Park for 11:30am and not to bring their cars. Stewards are also reminded to stay behind and help with the clean up operation.The Annual Presentation Night will take place in the Orchard Inn on Friday, Feb. 24th at 7:30pm. Tickets will be available later this week. The Hurlers opened their Ulster League campaign with a comprehensive win over Cluain (Glencar / Manorhamilton) by 2-17 to 0-06. This week they travel to Blacklion to take on Edgeworthstown outfit, Wolfe Tones.The club will be taking part in the first round of Scór Sinsir in Glenswilly this Saturday 11th February at 7.30pm. A good night is assured and all support will be welcome. Ádh mór agus go n-éirigh go geal le na hiomaitheoirí go léir as CLG Naomh Adhamhnáin.The next meeting for Strictly Come Dancing takes place on Thursday, Feb. 16th. Preparations are well under way and tickets will be available in the next week. The Big Night is on in the Mt. Errigal Hotel on Friday, March 9th.U8, U10 & U12 Girls Football training continues in the Loreto Gym on Wednesdays at 6pm with the U-14’s on at 7pm. New members welcome. Core / Circuit Training for the Ladies Minors and Seniors continues in the Loreto Gym on Fridays between 5:30pm and 7pm. New players welcome. Congratulations to Rose Boyle who made her competitive debut for the Donegal Senior Ladies on Sunday.There is a Level 1 Coaching Course in O’Donnell Park this weekend (Friday evening & Saturday during the day) 10th & 11th and possibly next weekend as well (4 day course). Anyone interested contact Jim Clarke asap on 086-3131550.Our new Registrar is holding a Registration  Day this Saturday, Feb. 11th in the Clubhouse between 11am – 1pm. All Minor Board members in particular are encouraged to attend as all players must be registered with the Northern Board by the end of February. Membership prices remain at the 2011 prices for 2012.There were 3 winning tickets in this week’s Lotto Draw. They matched 3 numbers and win €35 each. Numbers drawn were 1-4-11-13. Peter Timoney, Ballymacool; Brian McAleer, Lismonaghan (both card) and Jack McLaughlin, Port Rd. (Adrian). Next week’s jackpot is €1,550.The Community Games Ulster Finals will be held in Letterkenny on June 23rd. The events include Gaelic U10 boys/girls or mixed, Gaelic U12 girls, Camogie U14, Hurling U11, Rounders U13, U15 boys and girls teams, Handball U13, U15. Competitors must be under the age on the 31st July 2012 and may only compete for the area where they reside (East or West). Managers are required to prepare teams for the County Finals in these events and those willing to help out may contact the Secretary on 087-6282515. GAA: ST EUNAN’S GAA CLUB NOTES was last modified: February 7th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:GAA: ST EUNAN’S GAA CLUB NOTESlast_img read more

Antelope Valley Calendar

first_imgWEDNESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will host a “comedy and tall tales” evening, 7 o’clock in Lancaster. Bring jokes plus a snack to share and a beverage. Call (661) 267-2586 or (661) 943-5938. Sweet Talkers Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Wilsona School District boardroom, 18050 E. Ave. 0, Lake Los Angeles. Call (661) 944-1216 or 944-1130. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 will serve specialty meals, or hamburger baskets, 5:30-8 p.m. at the post, 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Proceeds will benefit community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Kids Managing Anger Together for ages 13-17 will meet, 4:30-6 p.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite. B-1, Palmdale. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Women’s Group will deal with the death of a loved one, divorce, loss of relationship, infertility and other issues, noon-1:30 p.m. Call (661) 266-8700. Fobi-Lyte Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month to address the medical, nutritional and social ramifications of weight-loss surgery in fourth-floor Conference Room 16 at Antelope Valley Outpatient Imaging Center, 44105 15th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 723-5123. Caregivers Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center, 44421 10th St. W., Suite I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-4852. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Eye Opener Toastmasters Club will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call Al Moore at (661) 726-3627. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente. Call Alan Strech at (661) 940-4640. Scrapbookers Club will meet, 5-7 p.m. at Peldyns, 27021 Twenty Mule Team Road, Boron. Free tools for use. Bring book and photos. Call (760) 608-1422. Antelope Valley Intertribal Council meeting, 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 435-0423. AIDS-related death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Sudden-death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Dual Recovery Anonymous, an informal 12-step group for mental health consumers with a history of substance abuse, will meet, 3 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call (661) 947-1595. Antelope Valley Interfaith Choir will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. For adults and mature teenagers. Call Kathe Walters at (661) 285-8306. Hi-Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at Don’s Restaurant, Victorville. Call (760) 240-4705. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 2 p.m. at the Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Belly dancing classes, 7-9 p.m. at the Alpine Grange, 8650 E. Ave. T-8, Littlerock. Lessons: $2. Call (661) 944-1747. Desert Noon Lions Club meets, noon-1 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at the California Pantry, 120 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call Barbara at (661) 947-4079. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Free. For information and location, call (661) 538-1846. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the multipurpose meeting room on the second floor at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. The organization is a 12-step, self-help group. Call (661) 943-5466. Little Angels, a support group for families with young children with Down syndrome, meets, 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the North Los Angeles County Regional Center, 43210 Gingham Ave., Lancaster. Call Cyndee Moore at (661) 945-6761 or e-mail cyndeem@nlacrc.com. Al-Anon discussion group will meet, 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale; Alateen at 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale, and a women’s discussion group at 7:30 p.m. at 32142 Crown Valley Road, Acton. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. A Course in Miracles discussion, 7-9 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 10 a.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Bridge Club for seniors will meet, noon-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Beginner and intermediate players welcome. Call (661) 267-5551. Blood pressure testing for seniors, 10-11:15 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Knitting and crocheting for seniors, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 704 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Bring your own supplies. Call (661) 267-5551. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale Children’s Youth Library, 38510 Sierra Highway. Call Kathy at (661) 265-1839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. in Multipurpose Room 2 at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 256-7064. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Women’s Eating Disorder Group will meet, 6-7:30 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. Bingo for seniors, 12:15-2:15 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Cost: 25 cents per card. Call (661) 267-5551. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente Mental Health Center, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 949-7423. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org THURSDAY High Desert Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at 1008 W. Ave. M-4, Palmdale. Call (661) 992-3229 or 944-1130. High Desert Modular Model Railroad Club meets, 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month in the Experimental Test Pilots Association boardroom, 44814 Elm Ave., Lancaster. Call Bob Drury at (661) 400-4479. Cedar Open Reading meets weekly, 7-9 p.m. in Cedar Hall, 44851 Cedar Ave., Lancaster, except on the second Thursday of the month when the meeting is in the gallery, 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4314. The Overcomers, an emotional and educational support group for mental health consumers, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call Bill Slocum or Mary Rogers at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Aces & Deuces Square Dance Club will meet, 7-8:15 p.m. for beginners and 8:15-9:30 p.m. for plus at Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale, for ages 10 and up. Cost: $3. Call (661) 256-7650. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Facilitated Anger Management Group for teens will meet, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults will meet, 6:30-8 p.m., at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Al-Anon will host a discussion, 1 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale; a step study at 7 p.m. at 1827 E. Ave. Q-10, Palmdale; and a meeting on Steps, Traditions, Concepts at 7:30 p.m. at 44815 Fig Ave., Suite 101, Lancaster. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. Information and location: (661) 723-9967. Desert Aire Women’s Golf Association will meet at Desert Aire Golf Course at Avenue P and 40th Street East in Palmdale. Call (661) 269-5982. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Country line dance lessons for seniors, 1-2 p.m. for beginners and 2:15 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Donation requested. Call (661) 267-5551. Soroptimist International of Antelope Valley will meet, noon at the Holiday Inn of Palmdale-Lancaster, 38630 5th St. W., Palmdale. Business and professional women are invited. Call (661) 946-1609. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 569 will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Grecian Isles Mobile Home Park, 4444 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-7672 or (661) 285-5003. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7:30-9 p.m. Step Workbook reading and writing. Call (661) 947-7935. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Support group for women in abusive or battering situations will meet, 1-3:30 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. A Spanish-language group also will meet, 10 a.m.-noon. Call (661) 945-6736 or (661) 945-5509. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. FRIDAY Fun After 40 Ballroom Dance Club will host ballroom dancing, 7:30-10 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12. Dance lessons: 6:30-7:30 p.m. Dance admission: $2 for club members, $4 for nonmenbers. Dance lessons: $2. Call (661) 943-0210 or 267-5551. Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at Lancaster Presbyterian Church, 1661 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Call (661) 951-2988. Celebrate Recovery will meet, 7 p.m. at the Harvest Office and Ministry Center, 43209 10th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-2803. Emotional Freedom Technique Group offers weekly demonstrations and practices, 6:30 p.m. (except before three-day weekends). Self-help tapping technique used to reduce or eliminate stress, cravings, pains, fears, phobias. Call (661) 945-4045. Speakers in the Wind Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Jack Knight at (661) 946-7166. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 10 a.m.-noon. Call Carmen Andersen at (661) 273-8122. MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) meets, 9:15 a.m.-noon the first and third Fridays of each month at Church of Christ, 1655 E. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Includes a hot breakfast buffet, discussion groups, featured speaker, craft and demonstrations. Children welcome. Cost: $5 for moms and $3 for kids. Call (661) 943-3162 or (661) 942-1638. Stress Management will meet, 1 p.m. at 43423 Division St., Suite 107, Lancaster. Call (661) 947-1595 or (661) 726-2850, Ext. 221. Speakers in the Wind Toastmaster Club 2867 will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Joyce Hall at (661) 946-1181 or Barbara Linde at (661) 947-2537. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Celebrate Recovery, a biblically based 12-step recovery program, will meet, 7 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 44648 15th St. W. Call Pastor Pat Tanner at (661) 948-0855. The Lightkeepers, Spiritual Discussion Group, will meet, 7:30 p.m. at Center of Light, A.V. Church, 1030 West Ave. L-8, Lancaster. Call (661) 718-8731. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 and Ladies Auxiliary will serve steak or shrimp dinners, 5:30-8 p.m. at 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Takeout orders. Proceeds will go to community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Meditation class, 7-8:30 p.m. For location and information, call (661) 945-9832. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. in the multipurpose room on the mental health ward at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people who have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Friendship Center, 43423 Division St. Suite 107, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Kaiser Permanente Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at the clinic offices, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Open to the community. Free. Call (661) 951-2988. The Weekenders, a social and recreational group for mental health consumers, will meet, 1-2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-1595. Al-Anon will have a 12-and-12 meeting at 10:30 a.m. at 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd. and a beginners meeting at 7 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Pinochle Group for seniors, 6-9 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Oil painting class for seniors, 9-11 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Shop Talk Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Crazy Otto’s Diner. Call Stan Main at (661) 269-1424. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 1681 will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. in Room 14 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4459. Rosamond Moose Lodge, 1105 Sierra Highway, Rosamond, will serve dinner, 5-8 p.m. Cost: $4-$6. Bingo will start at 10 a.m., offered by the Knights of Columbus, 719 W. Ave. M, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Room 13, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-0595. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. SATURDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will host an Mexican potluck and dance party, 7 p.m. in Palmdale. Bring a traditional main dish, salad or dessert to share and a beverage. Call (661) 267-2586 or (661) 273-7302. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Seniors Lunch-Bingo Hour, noon-5 p.m. the fourth Saturday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Sponsored by Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity). Call Emerita Ross at (661) 723-7876 or Marie Cabrera at (661) 726-5309. Al-Anon will have a Spanish-speaking discussion meeting, 9 a.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite C-3, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353. Facilitated Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 2:30-4 p.m.; teens, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults, 10:30-noon or 12:30-2 p.m. at the Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Beginning yoga, 9-10 a.m. at Unity Church of Antelope Valley, 39149 8th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 273-3341. Women and Self-esteem support group meets in the Acton area. Call (661) 947-0839. Healing Heart support group will meet, 4-5:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army store, 45001 Beech Ave. in Lancaster. Call (661) 943-5830. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 9 a.m. at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call Jane at (661) 945-4798. Women Midlife Transition Support Group for women over age 40 is facilitated by a professional psychotherapist. Call (661) 947-0839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. in Room 13 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 724-1820. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org or www.sava-na.org. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

ETB chairman wishes students good luck in their exams

first_imgDonegal ETB’s Chairperson, Cllr Martin Harley has wished all Leaving and Junior Certificate students in Donegal ETB schools and centres the very best of luck in their forthcoming exams.Cllr Harley, who chairs the largest education and training authority in the county, acknowledged the hard work of the students over the last two years.Cllr Harley, said, “On behalf of Donegal ETB, I would like to wish all the Junior and Leaving Certificate students across our fifteen schools and our adult learners in our Letterkenny Further Education and Training (FET) centre, the very best of luck as they prepare to sit their exams in the weeks ahead. They’ve put in a huge effort over the last two years and now is their chance to show the examiners what they are capable of.” ETB Chief Executive Anne McHugh echoed the Chairperson’s wordsShe said “We understand that students can be quite anxious as they sit their exams over the next few weeks but it’s important they stay calm and focus on the questions the paper asks.“We acknowledge that all our students and learners have put in a tremendous effort, as well as their parents, families and teachers who have supported them and helped them over the last two years. I wish them all the best of luck.”ETB chairman wishes students good luck in their exams was last modified: June 1st, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Will Evolutionary Psychology Be the First Darwinian Theory to Go?

first_imgEvolutionary psychologists are not getting much respect these days.  Some evolutionists, like Stephen Jay Gould and Richard Lewontin, criticized them for years.  Now, a new book came out against them and Science gave it a good review.1  To turn a Darwinian phrase, reviewer Johan J. Bolhuis said that the field of evolutionary psychology is undergoing negative selection pressure.    The book under review also turned a Darwinian phrase in its title, Evolutionary Psychology as Maladapted Psychology, by Robert C. Richardson, a philosopher of science.  Bolhuis, a member of the Behavioral Biology Group at Utrecht University, tied this maligned field to Charles Darwin right in the first sentence: “As we approach the 150th anniversary of the publication of On the Origin of Species, the theory of evolution is still not without controversy in the popular domain.”  It seemed logical to many to extend Darwin’s theory of evolution to cognition, “as Darwin himself did in The Descent of Man when he considered human characteristics such as morality or emotions to have been evolved.”    Both the author and reviewer accept evolution, and assent to the claim that our “psychological capacities are evolved traits.”  Nevertheless, they have problems seeing evolutionary psychology as a scientific enterprise.  Its flaws include:Blind reasoning:  It is questionable “whether particular human cognitive traits, such as language or human reasoning, can be seen as adaptations.”Tunnel vision:  Evolutionary psychologists tend to see everything in selectionist terms.  “The main problem with evolutionary psychology is that it usually does not consider alternative explanations but takes the assumption of adaptation through natural selection as given.”Blind zeal:  Enthusiasm by the proponents of evolutionary psychology outruns their science.  “Evolutionary psychologists often argue for their proposals with a zest and enthusiasm that seems to convey the message that we can only understand the human mind if we consider our evolutionary history.”Blind speculation:  The inability to find evidence for that history renders evolutionary psychology little more than storytelling.  For example, they say that human language evolved because of a functional demand in social groups.  Richardson, however, claims “we simply lack the historical evidence for a reconstruction of the evolution of human cognition.”On this last point, Bolhuis wound up for a knockout punch:Richardson rightly suggests that paleontologists are unlikely to unearth the evidence that can inform us about the social structure of our ancestral communities.  I think one can go a step further.  Even if we would be able to muster the evidence needed for an evolutionary psychological analysis of human cognition, it would not tell us anything about our cognitive mechanisms.  The study of evolution is concerned with a historical reconstruction of traits.  It does not, and cannot, address the mechanisms that are involved in the human brain.  Those fall within the domains of neuroscience and cognitive psychology.  In that sense, evolutionary psychology will never succeed, because it attempts to explain mechanisms by appealing to the history of these mechanisms.  To use the author’s words, “We might as well explain the structure of orchids in terms of their beauty.”Bolhuis ranked this book as excellent.  Combining this book with David Buller’s 2005 critique Adapting Minds (see 04/28/2005), he said, “the two books are complementary, and together they constitute a formidable critique of evolutionary psychology.”  Richardson in particular, he said in conclusion, “shows very clearly that attempts at reconstruction of our cognitive history amount to little more than ‘speculation disguised as results.’”    Bolhuis joked that Richardson is piling on the “selection pressure” against evolutionary psychology.  Presumably, he meant that Richardson did it intelligently by design.1.  Johan J. Bolhuis, “Piling on the Selection Pressure,” Science, 6 June 2008: Vol. 320. no. 5881, p. 1293, DOI: 10.1126/science.1157403.This is great.  Evolutionists are getting bold enough to criticize evolutionary psychologists in a pro-evolutionary science journal.  Progress is being made.    Now, all we have to do is point out to these people that the evolutionary biologists commit the same errors: assuming that adaptation implies evolution, refusing to consider alternative explanations, propounding their faith with zest and enthusiasm instead of evidence, telling stories about an inaccessible history, and disguising speculation as results.  What’s the difference?    If the evolutionists continue to work up the nerve to falsify each other, the whole Darwin castle might implode without an attack from outside.  Future archaeologists can study the ruins and help students learn from history that bad ideas eventually collapse from within.  Maybe the Darwin Bicentennial will turn out to be a moment of silence.(Visited 33 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Pinotage – a love it or hate it wine

first_imgThe Pinotage grape has its roots in South African viticulture. (Image: Darling Cellars) ‘You either love it or you hate it,’ says wine writer Christian Eedes – but Pinotage at its best can hold its own in any company.(Image: Yvonne Fontyn) The Pinotage flavour wheel was developed to encompass all the aromas produced by the homegrown varietal. Click here for a bigger version.(Image: Pinotage Association) MEDIA CONTACTS • Pinotage Association  +27 21 863 1599• Andre Morgenthal  Communications Manager, Wines of SA  +27 21 883 3860 RELATED ARTICLES • Lifetime award for wine leader • Women in Wine export winner • SA’s wine tourism, best in the world • Wine in three languages • ‘Most exciting’ New World wineYvonne FontynAn “incredible series of coincidences” is at the heart of the history of Pinotage, says the Pinotage Association. It was remarkable really that the original seedlings survived when gardeners were sent to clear an overgrown yard.The man who pioneered the variety – Abraham Izak Perold, the first professor of viticulture and later dean of agriculture at the University of Stellenbosch – in 1925 famously crossed Pinot Noir with Cinsaut grapes and planted the four seeds at his official university residence in nearby Welgevallen. In 1927, he moved to Paarl to work for KWV and the house was vacant for some time. The university sent around some workers to clean up the overgrown garden, with no particular instructions to save anything. A young lecturer happened to cycle past and knowing about the seedlings, went in and rescued them from the spades. He was Charles Niehaus, who himself later went on to make fine Cape wines and sherry. The plants were entrusted to the Elsenburg Agricultural College where, under the care of Professor CJ Theron, they flourished.At that stage the crossing was known merely as “Perold’s Hermitage x Pinot”, Hermitage being another name for Cinsaut. When Theron grafted material from the seedlings on to two other rootstocks – Richter 99 and Richter 57 – a name was sought for the new variety. Perold and Theron settled on Pinotage, after the plants’ breeding parents.The association presumes that an experimental Pinotage vineyard was started at Elsenburg as the first examples of the new red wine were produced there in small casks in 1941. It was made by CT de Waal, a member of the historic wine-making family, who was then a lecturer at the college.Two years later, the first commercial planting of the variety was made on the farm Myrtle Grove in Western Cape. The next lot was grown at De Waal’s Uiterwyk farm in 1950 and then, in 1953, Pinotage grapes were planted at Bellevue and Kanonkop in Stellenbosch and later at Meerendal in Durbanville. A decade later, Bellevue and Kanonkop won trophies at the Cape Young Wine Show. Their wines were blended to create Lanzerac Pinotage 1959, released by Stellenbosch Farmers’ Winery in 1961 as the first wine with Pinotage on the label to be sold to the public.Intriguing“Intriguing”, “an oddity”, “robust” – Pinotage has as many labels as it has drinkers and for the most part, as wine writer Christian Eedes says, “you either love it or hate it”. British wine journalist Richard Hemming did not beat about the bush when he said Pinotage had “distinctive singed / rubbery / banana flavours that are so provocative”.American wine critic Joe Roberts put it another way: the 2008 Kanonkop, he said, “deftly captures the entire BBQ picnic in a single bottle: toast, smoked meats, red fruits, bananas, leather purses and all. In the grand scheme of things, it’s a great introduction to high-end Pinotage and actually delivers quality and complexity levels a bit above its price point.”Yet it is well-known the wine did not have a good start when, in the late 1980s and early 1990s, less skilled winemakers began to overproduce it, launching inferior bottles on to the market and besmirching the name of Pinotage and South African wine in general. “Those lucky enough to have tasted Pinotage from the 1970s will know that the variety is capable of very good, even great wine,” said Eedes. “Unfortunately, during the mid-1990s, the period which saw South Africa re-enter international markets post-transformation, it did not enjoy its finest hour: at entry level, greedy producers flooded the market with very dull stuff, while at premium level, the variety proved difficult to work with, the resulting wines prone to acetone aromas, bitterness, bacterial spoilage and oxidation.”Pinotage has had to claw its way back into the public’s good books. Hence Hemmings’ further comment that the “understanding of how to craft the grape into a more conventional red wine” was growing. But as Eedes pointed out, if more conventional was what you were after there were so many other kinds of South African wine to sample, and Pinotage should not be mistaken as the representative of the country’s wines.Black cherry and plum“There has been much research into how to overcome these problems since the 1990s, and the best examples are no longer quirky oddities but can hold their own in any company,” Eedes wrote. “In terms of flavour profile, Stellenbosch Pinotage typically displays black cherry, plum and black currant fruit with firm tannins. More inland areas such as Tulbagh produce wines of even more pronounced dark fruit flavour and are typically very rich and full, while more maritime areas such as Walker Bay give wines that are more red-fruited, medium bodied and reminiscent of Pinot Noir.”Kanonkop is regarded as one of the top Pinotages and the Pinotage Association believes it was this estate which, in the 1980s, restored people’s faith in the variety after the first couple of false starts. The prestigious Diners Club Winemaker of the Year in 1987 was Beyers Truter at Kanonkop for his Pinotage. “Wine lovers went back to their cellars and opened the old bottles of Pinotage that they had stored right at the back,” says the Pinotage Association. “They were very pleasantly surprised at how well the wine had aged. Pleasant berry, banana and chocolate flavours had developed.” Kankonkop won again at the 1991 International Wine and Spirit Competition in London, when it was named the world’s best red wine.Apart from Kanonkop, the South African Pinotage Wine Guide 1995-2011 rates its top 20: Altydgedacht, Anura, Beyerskloof, Clos Malverne, De Waal, Fairview, Kaapzicht, L’Avenir, Laibach, Longridge, Lyngrove, Moreson, Rijk’s, Simonsig, Spier, Stellenzicht, Tukulu, Wellington, and Windmeul. According to Truter, 276 cellars in South Africa applied for certification to make Pinotage this year.Though Pinotage is regarded as peculiar to South Africa, it is not only here that it is grown and made. The variety was planted in New Zealand soon after Perold began experimenting in the Cape and there are commercial vineyards and winemakers today in Australia, Brazil, Israel, Switzerland, the US and even Canada. According to Peter May of the international, cyber-based Pinotage Club, L’Insitut Francais de la Vigne et du Vin this year gave legal approval for Pinotage to be planted and used for wine production in France.The numbersThough France is an importer of South African red and white wines, larger overseas markets that enjoy the particular flavour of Pinotage made in South Africa include the UK, Germany, Sweden and Denmark. According to the South African Wine Industry Information and Systems (Sawis), 455 484 tons of red grapes were crushed for wine-making in 2012. Of this, 64 603 tons, or 4.6%, were Pinotage. The grapes yielded 310-million litres of red wine but Sawis does not provide the breakdown by variety. It says, however, that 162.6-million litres of red wine were exported last year, with 14 811 279 litres being Pinotage. This figure is down from 15 854 794 in 2011 but up from 14 806 377 in 2010. Predictably, more Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon is exported, at 19 463 750 litres and 16 172 868 litres, respectively, last year.The total area dedicated to red varieties is 44 963ha, with Cabernet Sauvignon at 11 823ha and Shiraz at 10 457ha, according to Sawis. About 6 921 hectares, or 6.9%, is under Pinotage, with Malmesbury being the main producing area, at 23%. Paarl is second at 19% and Stellenbosch third at 18%.The Pinotage camp is growing and there is no shortage of awards and accolades for this variety. Kanonkop remains perhaps the most highly rated producer, in 1991 receiving the Robert Mondavi Trophy as the Best Red Wine at the International Wine and Spirits Competition in London. Truter, at the time the winemaker at Kanonkop, was nominated International Winemaker of the Year. According to the South African Pinotage Wine Guide, the judges said the grape variety and wine had tremendous potential and were “the future of South Africa”. “Pinotage should be taken seriously,” they emphasised. Since then a separate category has been created for this variety, putting it on the same level as the traditional European varieties.A Pinotage date to keep in mind is Friday, 30 August when Absa, in conjunction with the Pinotage Association, will announce the winners of the Absa Top 10 competition for 2012. Last year’s winners were: Beyerskloof Reserve 2008, Diemersdal Reserve 2010, Fairview Primo 2009, Kanonkop Pinotage 2006, KWV The Mentor’s Pinotage 2009, Laibach 2010, Naledi 2009, Rijk’s Private Cellar 2007, Schalk Burger & Sons Meerkat 2009, and Windmeul Reserve 2010.But awards aside, the proof of any wine remains in the tasting. A confirmed Cabernet drinker, sipping on a bottle of Simonsig Pinotage 2011, pronounced it a little tart when sampled soon after opening, but the next evening when it had breathed, he liked it much more. “Robust” was an adjective bandied around, along with “full-bodied” and “fruity”. Pinotage is not for the shy, but then there are so many other beverages on the market if that is what you are after.last_img read more

Farm Bureau approves Strategic Action Plan for 2016

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The American Farm Bureau Federation today released highlights of its 2016 strategic action plan, which addresses public policy issues in the coming year. The plan is a result of deliberations of delegates to the AFBF’s 97th Annual Convention in Orlando.The board-approved plan focuses the organization’s attention on a number of key issues including:Creating a more-positive dialogue with consumers about modern agricultural practices;Protecting farmers’ ability to use biotech plant varieties and other innovative technologies;Opposing unlawful expansion of federal jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act; andMoving forward with congressional approval of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement.“We will continue to work hard to protect the business of American agriculture on all fronts. This plan is an important roadmap to key issue areas that AFBF and our grassroots members will address in 2016,” AFBF President Zippy Duvall said.The Environmental Protection Agency’s new Waters of the U.S. rule remains among the most pressing issues in agriculture. Although presented as a water issue, the measure in fact would unlawfully regulate land in violation of the Clean Water Act itself. The rule takes over local and state authority while threatening private property rights and normal farming activity nationwide.“EPA’s blatant overreach is nothing short of a federal land grab,” Duvall said. “The administration has refused to listen to business owners, local governments and lawmakers. The courts have ordered this rule temporarily stopped. The Government Accountability Office found EPA’s actions illegal, and Congress—which originally gave EPA its authority under the Clean Water Act—called for an end to this rule. We won’t give up until it’s gone and farmers are free to care for their own land.”AFBF’s action plan also supports agricultural biotechnology that promises great benefits for agriculture, consumers and the environment.“Farmers and ranchers need better tools to be more productive and efficient. We will continue to defend farmers’ and ranchers’ access to biotechnology and protect their right to use other promising new technologies, from data services to drones,” Duvall said.The AFBF board reaffirmed its commitment to the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement.“TPP promises to open up markets around the Pacific Rim. These are some of the fastest-growing markets in the world, and America’s farmers and ranchers are ready to expand business there,” Duvall said. “We’re ready to work with Congress to move this agreement forward for the overall good of U.S. agriculture.”The action plan also places a special focus on food safety and security issues.“Consumers should have the confidence that their food is safe and wholesome. As farmers, we want the best for our families and yours. We’ve made great strides in opening up the dialogue to help consumers understand more about modern agriculture, but there’s a long way to go,” Duvall said. “All consumers deserve access to safe, affordable food, and we will continue to protect agriculture’s ability to meet that need.”The AFBF board approved an additional list of issues that will require close monitoring as they develop over the course of 2016. Those issue areas include advancing legislation that addresses agriculture’s long- and short-term labor needs, implementing business tax reform, monitoring the overall farm economy, and energy availability and affordability.last_img read more

Report: Silicon Valley Loses 90,000 Jobs In 2009

first_imgFor years Silicon Valley, the U.S. city at the forefront of innovation, has seen continued job creation, but the 2009 recession was too powerful for even the strongest of economies. According to the 2010 Index of Silicon Valley, a report released today from Joint Venture: Silicon Valley Network and the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, the city is seeing its worst declines in employment, venture funding, and government procurement in years.In 2009, San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties lost 90,000 jobs, returning the area to employment levels not seen in 5 years. Silicon Valley jobs fell faster than the average national employment rate of 3.8%, but this could be because the region held out longer than others in terms of job loss. Emmett Carson, CEO of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, says the downturn is due in part to a dwindling amount of foreign talent coming to the Valley.“On the heels of the worst economic year since the Great Depression, our region has entered a new era of uncertainty in which our ability to attract top talent, fund innovation and preserve a decent quality of life is no longer guaranteed,” says Carson.Echoing a national trend, innovation has lost steam in Silicon Valley also, as both venture funding and patent applications fell from 2008 to 2009. With substantial job loss and the construction of new office space, commercial office vacancies saw their highest numbers since 1998, rising 33% in 2009 from the previous year. Adding insult to injury, government procurement also continued its slow decline in Silicon Valley, dropping 2% over the last 15 years, while other cities like Washington D.C. and Huntsville, Alabama, have risen 7.2% and 4.5% respectively over that same period of time. Russell Hancock, CEO of Joint Venture, says the future of Silicon Valley is for the first time uncertain and at risk.“Silicon Valley’s innovation engine has driven the region’s prosperity for 60 years, but at the moment we’re stalled,” said Hancock. “What’s hard to say is whether we’re stuck in neutral, which has happened before, or whether it’s time now for a complete overhaul.”With the global economic slide, it only makes sense that Silicon Valley is too feeling the pinch, and it also doesn’t help that California’s state government is struggling to provide economic stability for its citizens. While Silicon Valley is a strong economy that will likely rebound with the rest of the nation from the “Great Recession,” if these trends continue for too long, a new technological hotbed could one day dethrone the king. Tags:#start#startups A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img chris cameron 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more