Tag: 2019上海龙凤419

Before crashing into the moon Israels lunar lander grabbed two final images

first_imgOriginally posted April 11.Update, April 17: Adds final image as described by SpaceIL. Just received from SpaceIL communication team what appears to be the last image #Beresheet spacecraft managed to beam to earth before it crashed on the moons surface pic.twitter.com/yDx2ioZiXy— Elad Ratson 🇮🇱 (@EladRatson) April 11, 2019 12 Photos Comment Artists we want SpaceX to take on its first private moon mission However, as more data filtered out to SpaceIL, the company tweeted a subsequent photo on Wednesday, showing the moon’s surface from a distance of just 15 kilometers out. The red and blue tinged surface of our closest cosmic neighbor was the last thing Beresheet was able to nab. Sci-Tech Landing on the face of another space rock is a decidedly difficult process. Although the lander did not achieve its core mission of a soft moon landing, it was still marked with a number of important firsts. Beresheet was the first private spacecraft to insert itself into lunar orbit and made Israel the seventh nation to achieve such a feat.The robotic explorers we send to new frontiers have a history of providing us with final images of other worlds before going gently (or violently) into the good night. Opportunity, the deceased Mars rover, was also able to snap a breathtaking panorama of the Martian surface, before it succumbed to a dust storm in 2018. Share your voice The surface of the moon as captured by Beresheet’s camera moments before it crashed into the lunar surface. Elad Raston/Twitter It was a bittersweet end for SpaceIL’s Beresheet probe, the first privately funded lunar lander humans have sent to the moon. During the landing attempt on Thursday, the main engine cut out and communication was lost, ultimately resulting in Beresheet crashing into the moon’s surface.But before its untimely demise, Beresheet was able to turn its camera toward the lunar surface to snap stunning final images of the lunar soil.Elad Raston, a diplomat at the Israel Foreign Ministry, tweeted that he had received “what appears to be the last image” that the spacecraft sent back to Earth before it failed on April 11, 2019. 1 Tags This is the last picture that Beresheet took, at a distance of 15 kilometers from the surface of the Moon.#Beresheet #SpaceIL pic.twitter.com/fGhNkvg5Qd— Israel To The Moon (@TeamSpaceIL) April 17, 2019last_img read more

Liberty Media buys Formula 1 in £6bn deal

first_imgUS group Liberty Media is close to taking control of Formula 1 in an $8.5bn (£6.5bn) deal, according to reports.The investment group, which also owns Virgin Media, is in advanced talks with CVC Partners, the US private equity group which controls the motorsport, said the Financial Times and German magazine Auto Motor und Sport. Liberty Media is owned by US billionaire John Malone.A deal could be hammered out within the next two weeks.CVC Capital Partners, which has a 35% stake in F1 has held a major share of the sport for the past decade. But for the past several years the sport has been swept by rumours that it wants to sell its holding.A host of other parties have previously been linked with buying into F1 including Qatar Sports Investments, which owns Paris Saint-Germain football club; and Stephen Ross, owner of the Miami Dolphins football team.If the deal goes ahead Chase Carey, the executive vice-chairman of US media group 21st Century Fox, is expected to become chairman of F1.However, a question mark remains over the future role of F1s longstanding chief executive Bernie Ecclestone, 85, who owns 5% of the sports parent company. At the Italian Grand Prix at Monza this weekend, Mr Ecclestone told reporters that Liberty are getting a lot of publicity out of their deals.It remains unclear whether Ecclestone is in favour of a deal with Liberty.F1 was not immediately available for comment.last_img read more

Church sex abuse victims go global with fight for justice

first_img(From L) Victims of sexual abuse Maniuse Mileiosky, Benjamin Kitobo, Peter Saunders, Jacques, Marek Lisinski and Denise Buchanan pose in front Saint Peter`s square on 18 February 2019, in Rome. Photo: AFPAfter years of struggling alone or finding support in national groups, survivors of sex abuse by priests have formed a new international alliance to pressure the Catholic Church to face up to its crimes.The group, called Ending Clerical Abuse (ECA), brings together activists from dozens of countries on several continents, and will be mobilised in Rome this week when Pope Francis hosts a hotly awaited summit on tackling the wave of child sex abuse scandals shaking the Catholic Church.”It’s a momentous and a historic movement… to bring a global and unified voice,” one of its co-founders, Peter Saunders, told AFP. “This is the first truly global initiative.”Saunders’ personal story is among countless others suffered by people who grouped together to form ECA last June, including survivors from Chile, Poland, Switzerland, France, Italy, the Democratic Republic of Congo and other countries.”I was abused at seven years old by a family member. I was also sexually abused by two Jesuit priests at my secondary school at about 12 years of age,” he said.The same priest targeted his brother Michael at the same school six years before him, and died aged 55 after a lifelong battle with drug and alcohol abuse.”I think the Church has been resisting change for many, many years and I think at long last the Church is beginning to bow to the pressure put on by survivors, by our media colleagues around the world, and by public opinion,” he added.The group’s objectives include forcing the Church to take a “zero tolerance” approach to paedophilia, working to overturn the statute of limitations on abuse cases, and supporting victims in areas where speaking out remains difficult, such as in various African and Asian countries.- ‘Counter-summit’ -From Wednesday to Sunday, ECA will bring together victims in Rome to put new pressure on Pope Francis, who has spoken out strongly over the last two years about abuse in the Church after a string of scandals worldwide.But on the ground, survivors say the fight against the culture of secrecy within the Catholic hierarchy and an instinct to cover up abuse cases remains entrenched.”Either I committed suicide or I spoke out,” said a 70-year-old Swiss co-founder of ECA, who gives his name only as Jacques. “It was a long and painful fight.”He said a priest raped him continually when he was aged 14 to 20. After years of therapy, in 2009 he contacted the priest who abused him and attempted to reach closure.Only after a five-year struggle did senior Church figures “understand the gravity of the acts of their colleague and accept moral responsibility on behalf of the institution,” he said.As he battled for justice, he also learned that the priest had been identified as a possible paedophile even before he was ordained and had been sent to France several times for “treatment”.In 2010, Jacques founded SAPEC, a victims group in French-speaking Switzerland, which led to the creation of a commission to investigate abuse and oversee compensation.- ‘No apology’ -In Poland, ECA co-founder Marek Lisinski, 50, said he had long dreamed of a new international organisation “to show Polish victims that they are not on their own.”He said he was “assaulted for 10 months by a vicar” at age 13 and his search for justice led to a prosecution.”I was forced to become an adult at age 13,” he said angrily.Over several years he fought dependencies on alcohol and anti-depressants, made three suicide attempts and went through a divorce.Finally, after nine years of legal proceedings, the vicar was suspended — but just for three years.”In 2018, the court ordered him to apologise to me, but did not award damages,” he said. “I have never had the apology.”Lisinsky added: “The Church has ignored victims, moves the perpetrators around (from one parish to another) and refuses to meet with us despite the instructions from the pope. Officially it has apologised… but as an institution it has never accepted its responsibility.”In 2013, Lisinsky created the Don’t Be Afraid Foundation, which gathered testimony from 700 victims.He published a shocking map online in October showing among other things all the parishes where abuse had been reported.”There is barely a day without a victim coming forward to our Foundation. The youngest is a boy of 11,” he said.Chilean activist Jose Andres Murillo, 43, struggled for 20 years before getting a measure of justice.Also a founding member of ECA, Murillo was instrumental in bringing to light a huge scandal in Chile that led to 88-year-old priest Fernando Karadima being defrocked and prosecuted.He said ECA needs to act “to create secure spaces within the Church”, safe from abuse.”Faith is something positive for a lot of people, which helps them get through difficult moments, but that does not give the Church the right to create trauma in people’s lives,” he said.last_img