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Ja’s Davis too tough for young American

first_imgJamaica’s Tsetsi Davis, one of the favourites to take the 2016 version of the Wray and Nephew Contender title, had an easy first fight, on Wednesday night, as he completely overwhelmed his young American opponent Courtney McCleave in their five round fight at the Chinese Benevolent Association auditorium.     McCleave’s corner threw in the towel at two minutes and 10 seconds of round four. McCleave, who is 21 years old, and has been a professional boxer for only a year, showed his inexperience  right  from the start of the fight. He really looked like a boxer with only three previous fights, two of which he lost, and his record is now one victory and three losses. Davis, who now has a 15-4 record,  had won the three previous rounds easily and seemed to be on the brink of a knockout victory when McCleave’s corner threw a towel in the ring to signal to referee Ransford Burton, that their fighter was in no condition to continue. It was the right decision for them to make, as McCleave would just have been  beaten up badly and knocked out, if the fight had continued. Davis, who last fought on July 1 last year, when he dropped a majority decision to Richard Holmes, showed that he was in need of a fight. He stalked McCleave  from the opening bell, but  missed with several  punches that were thrown to his opponent’s head. His timing was badly off and he would have been better served if he had tried to build up his attacks behind his jab. McCleave showed some boxing skills as he tried to score points with his jabs, but these were tentative and had no muscle behind them.  A few landed to Davis’ head and body but had no visible effect on him and certainly did not dissuade him from coming in. After repeatedly missing with punches to the head, Davis changed strategy and made the body his target, and this paid dividends, as McCleave was definitely hurt a few times.  He increased the pressure each round and after round three it was clear that the fight would not  last much longer.  Davis stepped up the pace at the start of this round,  and his hooks to the body made McCleave wince in pain. His corner saw what was happening and correctly gave the signal to the referee that their fighter had had enough. Davis now moves on the quarter-finals, where he will certainly get better opposition. He has a lot of work to do in the meantime, however, as his conditioning seemed suspect. He is, however, one step closer to the first prize of $2-million and the title that has eluded him over the years. In the amateur bouts that preceded the main event,  Raheim Pitter from Boys’ Town scored a first round technical knockout victory over Shaquille O’Neil from Sugar Olympic gym, while Joshua Forrest-Davidson from Seaview Gardens gym had a similar second round victory over Joel Wedderburn from the St. Thomas Boxing Club.last_img read more

Will Evolutionary Psychology Be the First Darwinian Theory to Go?

first_imgEvolutionary psychologists are not getting much respect these days.  Some evolutionists, like Stephen Jay Gould and Richard Lewontin, criticized them for years.  Now, a new book came out against them and Science gave it a good review.1  To turn a Darwinian phrase, reviewer Johan J. Bolhuis said that the field of evolutionary psychology is undergoing negative selection pressure.    The book under review also turned a Darwinian phrase in its title, Evolutionary Psychology as Maladapted Psychology, by Robert C. Richardson, a philosopher of science.  Bolhuis, a member of the Behavioral Biology Group at Utrecht University, tied this maligned field to Charles Darwin right in the first sentence: “As we approach the 150th anniversary of the publication of On the Origin of Species, the theory of evolution is still not without controversy in the popular domain.”  It seemed logical to many to extend Darwin’s theory of evolution to cognition, “as Darwin himself did in The Descent of Man when he considered human characteristics such as morality or emotions to have been evolved.”    Both the author and reviewer accept evolution, and assent to the claim that our “psychological capacities are evolved traits.”  Nevertheless, they have problems seeing evolutionary psychology as a scientific enterprise.  Its flaws include:Blind reasoning:  It is questionable “whether particular human cognitive traits, such as language or human reasoning, can be seen as adaptations.”Tunnel vision:  Evolutionary psychologists tend to see everything in selectionist terms.  “The main problem with evolutionary psychology is that it usually does not consider alternative explanations but takes the assumption of adaptation through natural selection as given.”Blind zeal:  Enthusiasm by the proponents of evolutionary psychology outruns their science.  “Evolutionary psychologists often argue for their proposals with a zest and enthusiasm that seems to convey the message that we can only understand the human mind if we consider our evolutionary history.”Blind speculation:  The inability to find evidence for that history renders evolutionary psychology little more than storytelling.  For example, they say that human language evolved because of a functional demand in social groups.  Richardson, however, claims “we simply lack the historical evidence for a reconstruction of the evolution of human cognition.”On this last point, Bolhuis wound up for a knockout punch:Richardson rightly suggests that paleontologists are unlikely to unearth the evidence that can inform us about the social structure of our ancestral communities.  I think one can go a step further.  Even if we would be able to muster the evidence needed for an evolutionary psychological analysis of human cognition, it would not tell us anything about our cognitive mechanisms.  The study of evolution is concerned with a historical reconstruction of traits.  It does not, and cannot, address the mechanisms that are involved in the human brain.  Those fall within the domains of neuroscience and cognitive psychology.  In that sense, evolutionary psychology will never succeed, because it attempts to explain mechanisms by appealing to the history of these mechanisms.  To use the author’s words, “We might as well explain the structure of orchids in terms of their beauty.”Bolhuis ranked this book as excellent.  Combining this book with David Buller’s 2005 critique Adapting Minds (see 04/28/2005), he said, “the two books are complementary, and together they constitute a formidable critique of evolutionary psychology.”  Richardson in particular, he said in conclusion, “shows very clearly that attempts at reconstruction of our cognitive history amount to little more than ‘speculation disguised as results.’”    Bolhuis joked that Richardson is piling on the “selection pressure” against evolutionary psychology.  Presumably, he meant that Richardson did it intelligently by design.1.  Johan J. Bolhuis, “Piling on the Selection Pressure,” Science, 6 June 2008: Vol. 320. no. 5881, p. 1293, DOI: 10.1126/science.1157403.This is great.  Evolutionists are getting bold enough to criticize evolutionary psychologists in a pro-evolutionary science journal.  Progress is being made.    Now, all we have to do is point out to these people that the evolutionary biologists commit the same errors: assuming that adaptation implies evolution, refusing to consider alternative explanations, propounding their faith with zest and enthusiasm instead of evidence, telling stories about an inaccessible history, and disguising speculation as results.  What’s the difference?    If the evolutionists continue to work up the nerve to falsify each other, the whole Darwin castle might implode without an attack from outside.  Future archaeologists can study the ruins and help students learn from history that bad ideas eventually collapse from within.  Maybe the Darwin Bicentennial will turn out to be a moment of silence.(Visited 33 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Caregiving Tips for the Holidays

first_imgAlthough the holidays can be a joyous occasion, they can also cause our lives to become more hectic and stressful. Caregivers can become overwhelmed by continuing to take care of their service member while also trying to make this time of the year special and memorable. Below are some suggestions to help you make it through the holiday season.1. Don’t be afraid to ask for help with caregiving dutiesSometimes the things you’re most grateful for are not material things, but help. During the holiday seasons there seem to be more things to do each day, and less time to get it done. Don’t be afraid to make your wish list with caregiving activities on it. Talk to your family and friends about helping you out with running errands, taking service members to appointments, or helping you out around the house. Remember that you need to take care of yourself to, so let your loved ones pitch in this holiday season.2. Recognize the signs and symptoms of burnoutDuring the holidays your stress level may reach an all-time high trying to juggle caring for your wounded warrior as well as everything that the holidays entail. Lookout for signs of becoming overwhelmed. If you reach the point of becoming overwhelmed try some mindfulness techniques to refocus your attention and move past the stress.3. Simplify your holiday activitiesThe hype of the holidays and the buildup we create with our imaginations is difficult if not impossible to actually manage and maintain. Change your expectations to something that you can obtain without adding more stress to your life. Set limits to help you manage this time. If you are preparing a holiday meal, try choosing foods that are simpler to cook, try crockpot meals, eat out or order a prepared meal.4. Consider making new holiday traditionsTraditions are wonderful and can be something to look forward to, but sometimes they can become too overwhelming. If this is the case consider starting a new tradition that suits where you’re at better. Go easy on yourself and understand that as a caregiver you are creating a ‘new normal’ which will inevitable cause some changes.5. Be aware of and anticipate triggers from your service memberAlthough the holidays are meant to bring joy and happiness, sometimes the holidays may trigger stress and unhappy memories for your service member.  Be mindful and acknowledge their emotions as well as yours. Service members may feel anxious in large holiday crowds; and they may even trigger negative emotions because your service member may no longer be able to participate in the same ways they were accustomed to. Try to stay focused on the positive and remember how thankful you are that they are with you, especially during the holidays.This MFLN-Military Caregiving concentration blog post was published on December 4, 2015.last_img read more