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Taylor Swift doles out sage social media advice in essay for Elle

first_img Share your voice Music Online Comment Tags Taylor Swift’s Reputation tour lives forever and ever on Netflix How Taylor Swift flipped online fandom on its head for the better Some days social media is a laugh-a-minute whirlwind punctuated by puppy gifs, travel inspo and meme exchanges with your best online friends. Some days it is hell.It’s something global superstar Taylor Swift knows all too well.In an essay on turning 30 for the latest edition of Elle magazine, Swift opens up about how she copes with the massive amount of noise directed at her through social media platforms, and specifically how she deals with negative comments and trolls. Taylor Swift 1 It’s unlikely that any regular human being gets anything like the influx of notifications or comments that celebrities deal with. But as Swift explains, minimizing this is more than just about keeping the constant pinging to a minimum.”Social media can be great, but it can also inundate your brain with images of what you aren’t, how you’re failing, or who is in a cooler locale than you at any given moment,” she said in the essay.”One thing I do to lessen this weird insecurity laser beam is to turn off comments. Yes, I keep comments off on my posts. That way, I’m showing my friends and fans updates on my life, but I’m training my brain to not need the validation of someone telling me I look.”The question of how much of our ego and self-worth is tied up in validation from social media is relatable no matter how many, or how few followers, you might have. Whether you turn off comments and notifications or delete apps altogether for a while, everyone has their own way of getting a handle on those negative feelings — Swift included. “I think it’s healthy for your self-esteem to need less internet praise to appease it, especially when three comments down you could unwittingly see someone telling you that you look like a weasel that got hit by a truck and stitched back together by a drunk taxidermist. An actual comment I received once,” she said.For Swift, a successful woman, abuse and negativity are sad and still unavoidable side effects of putting herself out there. Keeping comments turned off is one way to block out “anyone who might feel the need to tell me to ‘go die in a hole ho’ while I’m having my coffee at nine in the morning,” she said.Swift is in the top 10 most-followed people across multiple platforms, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. But for the reasons she herself has stated, it’s rare to see her engage with people directly through any of these services. Instead she tends to hang out on Tumblr, where she follows many of her fans. She often likes and sometimes comments on or reblogs their posts.But there have been times when Swift has disappeared from the internet altogether. In her essay, she described what it feels like when it feels like the internet turns completely against you.”A few years ago, someone started an online hate campaign by calling me a snake on the internet,” she said. “The fact that so many people jumped on board with it led me to feeling lower than I’ve ever felt in my life, but I can’t tell you how hard I had to keep from laughing every time my 63-foot inflatable cobra named Karyn appeared onstage in front of 60,000 screaming fans.”Unlike the other measures suggested by Swift, this might not be a practical solution for everyone dealing with internet bullying. But the point is to take a stand and make a statement in a way that allows you to laugh rather than feel bad about yourself.”It’s the Stadium Tour equivalent of responding to a troll’s hateful Instagram comment with ‘lol,'” she said. Related storieslast_img read more

Faith activists urge UN Environment Assembly to address human side of climate

first_img Tagscreation care dietary laws ecology environmentalism faith and environment homepage featured Pan-Amazon synod U.N. Environment Assembly Vatican Synod,You may also like As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,NAIROBI, Kenya (RNS) — At a small tent on the edge of the U.N. campus here, environmental activists from the world’s faith traditions huddled on the sidelines of last week’s March 11-15 meeting of some 5,000 environmental scientists, politicians and civil society, the fourth gathering of the United Nations Environment Assembly.As the official delegates discussed current environmental challenges, sustainable consumption and production, the faith leaders, who joined the assembly for the first time in a U.N.-sponsored event called “Faith for Earth Dialogue,” talked about what religion’s role is in environmental protection.“Religious leaders have a unique role to play in promoting ecological sustainability, especially because 85 percent of the (world’s) people are affiliated with a religion,” said Rabbi Yonatan Neril, who is the founder and executive director of the Interfaith Center for Sustainable Development in Jerusalem and attended the event.The faith-based group unexpectedly served as a spiritual presence after the Ethiopian Airlines crash, which particularly affected the U.N.’s offices in Nairobi, a hub of the international aid community that lost several members in the disaster.The assembly, which represented more than 170 United Nations member states, said it had delivered a bold blueprint for change that directs a radical shift in the approach to tackling environmental challenges.The group also agreed on a series of non-binding resolutions, key among them a proposal to protect oceans and fragile ecosystems.But those attending the Faith for Earth Dialogue urged the U.N. to recognize the growing religious wave of concern and called for dramatic steps while saying that enough was not being done to address climate change and related environmental challenges.The Rev. Fletcher Harper, left, addresses panelists during the U.N.-sponsored event called “Faith for Earth Dialogue” at the U.N. Environment Assembly in Nairobi, Kenya, on March 15, 2019. RNS photo by Fredrick Nzwili“There should be no mistake that more and more religious communities are clear that we face a clear emergency,” said the Rev. Fletcher Harper, the executive director of GreenFaith, an American interfaith coalition for the environment.“We need a stronger representation of values, combined with science, to underlie the policies of the world in relationship to the environment,” said Harper.At the same time, Harper said, it was not easy for intergovernmental bodies like the U.N. to integrate faith voices because their audiences are nation states, for whom religion can be a complicated subject.The world’s religions can look for ways to change their own cultures to make faith itself more sustainable, said Neril.RELATED: Clergy divided as Kenya moves to save forest, evict 40,000 settlers“Meat in particular has a disproportional impact on climate change because cows emit methane from their digestive systems,” said the rabbi. Changing diets can be difficult, but religious teaching can have a powerful effect on what we put in our mouths and can support compassion toward animals.Rev. Joshtrom Isaac Kureethadam, coordinator of the Sector on “Ecology and Creation” at the Vatican Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development, said he took hope from the increasing spiritual response to climate change, including the indigenous communities around the world who view themselves as the protectors of the land or planet.He cited climate change as one reason Pope Francis has called a special synod for October of this year of Roman Catholic bishops from the Pan-Amazonian region.“He (Pope Francis) believes at the period of planetary emergency, the answer can come from these people, who have defended our common home for thousands of years. We can learn from their indigenous wisdom,” said the priest. “It is a time when the whole world will sit at the feet of the indigenous people and learn from them to take care of our common home.”Experts say tropical forests that are home to other indigenous groups in the Congo Basin, Asia and Central America also help regulate regional and international weather patterns.Above all, the faith activists urged the U.N. delegations to the assembly to approach climate change as an urgent human problem as much as a scientific one.Bright Mawudor, the deputy general secretary of the African Conference of Churches, said in a speech to her fellow faith leaders that climate change was the world’s common future. “It’s as real as the food that we eat or as the clothes we wear. We need to tackle it with urgency,” Mawudor said. Share This! Share This! Catholicism Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email In Tel Aviv, Jews join with Muslims in vigil mourning New Zealand dead Photos of the Week August 30, 2019 By: Fredrick Nzwili Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 News Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.,Survey: Black millennials skip church as early adults more than whites center_img By: Fredrick Nzwili Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! By: Fredrick Nzwili Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email News • Photos of the Week Fredrick Nzwili Fredrick Nzwili is a journalist based in Nairobi, Kenya. For more than 15 years, he has written about religion, politics, peace and conflict, development, security, environment and wildlife. His articles have appeared in international media organizations among others; The Tablet, The Christian Science Monitor, The National Geographic and Kenyan local newspapers; The Standard and the People Daily.,Add Comment Click here to post a comment Fredrick Nzwili Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Share This!last_img read more

Can acting help improve memory

first_imgHave you ever felt annoyed with yourself, maybe for forgetting to do an important task?If so, acting out things you are supposed to remember or pretending that you are actually doing it, can help you recall.The findings showed that alternative enactment techniques, such as acting, can improve prospective memory – where you have not remembered to take the action you had planned. This involves recreating an action and pretending that you are actually doing it, in as much vivid detail as possible, the researchers said. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfA failing prospective memory can be an early sign of Alzheimer, according to lead author Antonina Periera, psychologist at the University of Chichester in the UK.In the research, published in the journal Neuropsychology, it was examined the prospective memory performance in nearly 100 participants. It included patients with mild cognitive impairment aged 64 – 87 years, healthy older adults aged 62 – 84 years and younger adults aged 2 –18 years.Participants reported improvement, especially the older subjects with mild cognitive impairment in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. It was confirmed that prospective memory erodes as we get older and that enactment techniques might support those with a poor prospective memory.The enactment techniques “can have long lasting effects even for people with cognitive impairment.last_img read more