Tag: 上海龙凤网

Wolves v Fulham line-ups: Whites unchanged, defender on bench, debut for Wolves teenager

first_imgFulham named an unchanged line-up for their visit to Wolves.Slavisa Jokanovic has unsurprisingly stuck with the same team that thrashed Reading 5-0 last time out.It means Denis Odoi, back from suspension, has to make do with a place on the bench.Former Wolves midfielder Kevin McDonald starts on his return to Molineux.The hosts name 19-year-old Harry Burgoyne in goal for his full debut, with Carl Ikeme and former Whites keeper Andy Lonergan both injured.Defender Richard Stearman, who is on loan from Fulham, is ineligible to face his parent club so Kortney Hause returns.They are the only two changes from the side that beat QPR as Wolves look to complete a west London double.Wolves: Burgoyne; Iorfa, Baath, Hause, Doherty; Edwards, Saiss, Coady; Helder Costa, Dicko, Ivan Cavaleiro.Subs: Flatt, Borthwick-Jackson, Price, Saville, Teixeira, Enobakhare, Bodvarsson.Fulham: Button; Fredericks, Ream, Kalas, Malone; McDonald, Johansen; Aluko, Cairney, Ayite; Martin.Subs: Bettinelli, Odoi, Sigurdsson, Sessegnon, Parker, Kebano, Piazon.   Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Drink This Before Bed, Watch Your Body Fat Melt Like Crazy x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Life Masters Physics

first_imgLiving things, especially cells, have mastered the forces of advanced physics in ingenious ways.  This ingenuity sometimes inspires physicists to try to copy it.  Here are some recent examples:Photosynthesis and quantum mechanics:  Nature reported that plants take advantage of quantum mechanics in photosynthesis.1  “The photosynthetic apparatus of cryptophyte algae is odd – its pigments are farther apart than is expected for efficient functioning.  A study into how this apparatus works so well finds quantum effects at play.”  Grondelle and Novoderezhkin continued, showing that plants exceed humans at this skill:It is common knowledge that plants, algae and certain bacteria use photosynthesis to convert solar energy into a form that can be used by the organisms to live and reproduce.  But what is less well known is that the efficiency of photosynthesis might depend in part on quantum-mechanical processes.  On page 644 of this issue, Collini et al.2 report evidence suggesting that a process known as quantum coherence ‘wires’ together distant molecules in the light-harvesting apparatus of marine cryptophyte algae.  This is the first time that this phenomenon has been observed in photosynthetic proteins at room temperature, rather than at much lower temperatures, bolstering the idea that quantum coherence influences light harvesting in vivo.Collini et al appeared surprised by their discovery: “Intriguingly, recent work has documented that light-absorbing molecules in some photosynthetic proteins capture and transfer energy according to quantum-mechanical probability laws instead of classical laws at temperatures up to 180 K,” they said.  “This contrasts with the long-held view that long-range quantum coherence between molecules cannot be sustained in complex biological systems, even at low temperatures.”  The plants’ ability to use “counter-intuitive design” employ quantum mechanical laws boosts the efficiency of light harvesting.  Grondelle and Novoderezhkin titled their article, “Quantum design for a light trap.”Smart grid technology:  Continuing on the theme of photosynthesis, a commentary in PNAS by David M. Kramer (Washington State U)3 describes how plants and other phototrophs (light-loving organisms) employ a “smart grid” system to dissipate excess energy and prevent damage:To deal with the Promethean consequences of harvesting light, phototrophs have evolved a photonic “smart grid” that balances the delivery of light energy to its two photosystems—photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII)—to prevent overexcitation and subsequent production of reactive oxygen species.  Like human-engineered electrical systems, the photonic smart grid can regulate energy transfer at several levels.  Unlike its engineered counterparts that have controllable power plants, phototrophs cannot down-regulate the sun.  Instead, when light capture exceeds the capacity of the system to process it, it must be dissipated or rerouted to avoid photodamage.  Chloroplasts deal with this problem by adjusting the properties of the photosynthetic antennae under photodamaging conditions.Kramer went on to describe how the power plant has a fail-safe mechanism.  The default state of the conformation of molecules in the photosystem is probably in the quenched mode – the safe mode.  “In this way, several different stimuli can result in similar down-regulation of the photonic smart grid.”Adhesion by cohesion:  We know that post-it notes work by creating cohesive forces with tiny droplets on paper.  Beetles employ a similar trick to stick to leaves.  They are so good at it, they can cling to leaves with a force 100 times their own weight, and then instantly detach themselves.  They achieve this by controlling thousands of tiny liquid droplets in their feet.  The adhesion created by surface tension in any one drop is small, but the large number of droplet contacts adds up.    Inspired by the success of the beetles, engineers at Cornell, with funding from the National Science Foundation and DARPA, have created a prototype adhesive that works on the same principle.  It controls the droplets with electric fields.  By reversing the fields, it can detach the device easily.  Their main problem is figuring out how to keep the droplets from coalescing, but they are making progress.  Science Daily reported that their palm-size device that employs water surface tension might make it possible for future Spider-man mimics to walk on walls.Acoustical nanomechanics:  “NASA Studies Nanomechanics of Inner Ear,” announced PhysOrg.  We often take our balance for granted, but it depends on sophisticated responses of tiny hair cells to the environment (see also a second PhysOrg article on this subject).  But how do the hair cells maintain enhanced sensitivity to very small movements without being overwhelmed by large movements?  The article describes how the amplifier can be instantly switched on or off by the organism.The inner ear organs are designed and precisely attuned to changes in the environment: for the hearing organ, a change in the sound pressure, such as caused by a car horn, can deform the ear drum and rapidly lead to the recognition and location of the sound.  For the balance organ, movement of the head, such as unexpectedly stepping off the curb, is sensed and rapidly leads to motor reflexes to maintain equilibrium.  The more sensitive our ability is to detect these changes, the more acute our sensation.  This remarkable tuning and amplification to detect the slightest stimuli, allows us to adjust our posture.NASA wants to understand these mechanisms so as to help astronauts avoid vertigo in space.  They are studying the hair cells in toadfish.  “Fossil evidence, dating from at least the Devonian Period 400 million years ago, shows that the elaborate sensory structures used to sense the organism’s movement are remarkably conserved among vertebrata.  The results demonstrate an active process in the hair cells of an ancient bony fish, thus suggesting that the mechanism is ancestral, and may underlie the broad appearance of active hair cell processes in amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, including humans.”  For a picture of one of the hair cells, see Science Daily.Cilia got rhythm:  A paper in Nature last month tackled the problem of how cilia and flagella beat with regular oscillations.4  To understand it, the researchers came up with a mathematical model that employed “opposed motors and springs.”  In particular, they studied the oscillation of the flagellum in sperm cells to come up with a “sperm equation.”  This excerpt sounds like something out of an engineering textbook:Any oscillation can be described as a sum of sinusoidal oscillations of increasing frequency, called Fourier modes; sideways oscillations can be described by the temporal Fourier modes of tangent angles.  Power-spectrum analysis showed that experimentally observed oscillations in tangent angles were well approximated using only the first (fundamental) Fourier mode, so the sperm equation could be analytically solved using values of this mode.  Tangent angles quantify the curvature of the axoneme at a given position, and the curvature is geometrically related to the sliding distance between doublets at that position.  The sperm equation thus relates time-dependent angular movement at each position to the extent and rate of inter-doublet sliding at that position, and to the local forces that either oppose or promote further sliding.    The model contains two adjustable parameters – stiffness and friction of the active material inside the axoneme that deforms and exerts force during bending.  It also contains several fixed parameters that J�licher and colleagues independently measured and fed into the equation.  These include the hydrodynamic drag of the moving flagellum and its ordinary stiffness, both of which oppose active deformation, and the beat frequency.  The authors obtained an excellent fit to the data, with both internal stiffness and friction taking the negative values expected for an active material.  Importantly, a microscopic model of dynein behaviour, incorporating the force-dependent detachment concept illustrated in Figure 2, predicted negative values for stiffness and friction similar to those obtained by fitting the sperm equation.The authors went on to describe physics concepts like beat frequency, force-detachment relationships, piston-like movement of doublets at the base of the cilia, and sliding friction.  Your life depended on a sperm cell understanding the physics of beating its way to an egg cell – and still depends on trillions of other cilia and flagella being good physicists in the cells of your body today.Bacterial flagellar switch:  A paper in Science discussed how the flagella of a bacteria can cooperate by using a stochastic switch.5  Several of the authors work in the Department of Physics at Oxford – not just the biology department.  “The elements of protein signaling networks are often complexes that change their activity in response to binding specific ligands,” their paper began.  “Multisubunit protein complexes often show cooperativity, with either binding or activity showing a switchlike sigmoidal dependence upon ligand concentration.”    The authors introduced the concept of “conformational spread” to explain the switching behavior between clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) rotation.  The description went on to discuss physical properties of the system: elasticity, a two-state Poisson process, stochastic coupling, and more.  The fact that these cellular machines can be described with the tools of mechanics not only emphasizes the physics in biophysics, but shows how human engineers envy the techniques that living things have mastered.Thermodynamics: Maxwell’s demon found:  The 19th-century physicist James Clerk Maxwell knew that entropy must increase in a system, but envisioned a way to overcome it: putting an intelligent selector in the system.  A “demon” could, in principle, isolate hot and cold molecules into different compartments, for instance.  PNAS reported that bacteria could be employed to harness random Brownian motion to turn gears.6The laws of thermodynamics prohibit extraction of useful work from the Brownian motion of molecules or particles in systems at equilibrium (nonexistence of a perpetuum mobile of the second kind or Maxwell demon).  When, however, such randomly moving objects interact with certain types of time-varying external potentials or with asymmetric geometrical obstacles under nonequilibrium conditions, their motions can be “rectified” and made directional.  This phenomenon, first considered by Smoluchowski and then analyzed in detail by Feynman, underlies the operation of so-called Brownian ratchets and motors.  The examples of biological “Brownian motors” include kinesin and myosin proteins converting chemical energy into directed motion on microtubules, and bacteria propelling themselves in viscous fluid owing to the “asymmetry”/chirality of flagellar rotation.The authors suggest that human engineers could employee flagella as Maxwell demons to turn nanoscopic gears.  It should be noted that all the instances they listed of Brownian ratchets are found in living systems or were produced by human engineers.Network engineering:  To build a better distribution network, make like a leaf.  PhysOrg announced that “Leaf veins inspire a new model for distribution networks.” Following the straight and narrow may be good moral advice, but it’s not a great design principle for a distribution network.  In new research, a team of biophysicists describe a complex netting of interconnected looping veins that evolution devised to distribute water in leaves.  The work, which bucks decades of thinking, may compel engineers to revisit some common assumptions that have informed the building of many human-built distribution networks.The netted patterns seen in leaves may not only be the most efficient way to get cargo from here to there; it may also provide the best safety net.  The “tree network” most commonly deployed lacks the redundancy of leaf networks.  “By contrast, in the leaves of most complex plants, evolution has devised a system to distribute water that is more supple in at least two key ways,” responding to fluctuating demand and re-routing around damaged parts of the network.  Videos in the article show how water is distributed in different kinds of leaves.  The article also pointed out that the loopy network design is also found in corals and insect wings.  “These findings could seriously shake things up,” a researcher said.  “People will have to take another look at how they design these kinds of systems.”  One of the researchers is further studying how the design handles fluctuating loads, “guided by nature’s own solution in the leaf.”The last entry talked about evolution numerous times: e.g., “evolution has devised a system” to do this or that, personifying evolution as some kind of engineer directing mutations toward a goal – an invalid notion in evolutionary theory.  As evidence, the article pointed to the ginkgo tree as a “primitive” (less evolved) plant with a simpler distribution of veins.  The article did not point explain, though, if its leaves were primitive, why it survived as a “living fossil” from ancient times all the way to the present, nor why corals, more ancient than ginkgo, already were outfitted with the more-advanced loop network design.1.  Grondelle and Novoderezhkin, “Photosynthesis: Quantum design for a light trap,” Nature 463, 614-615 (4 February 2010); doi:10.1038/463614a.2.  Collini et al, “Coherently wired light-harvesting in photosynthetic marine algae at ambient temperature,” Nature 463, 644-647 (4 February 2010); doi:10.1038/nature08811.3.  David M. Kramer, “The photonic ‘smart grid’ of the chloroplast in action,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, online February 5, 2010, doi: 10.1073/pnas.0914429107. 4.  T. J. Mitchison and H. M. Mitchison, “Cell biology: How cilia beat,” Nature 463, 308-309 (21 January 2010); doi:10.1038/463308a.5.  Bai, Branch et al, “Conformational Spread as a Mechanism for Cooperativity in the Bacterial Flagellar Switch,” Science, 5 February 2010: Vol. 327. no. 5966, pp. 685-689, DOI: 10.1126/science.1182105. 6.  Sokolov et al, “Swimming bacteria power microscopic gears,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, January 19, 2010 vol. 107 no. 3 969-974, 10.1073/pnas.0913015107.Don’t you get sick of the constant credit evolution gets for engineering design?  It’s sickening because it is nonsensical.  Evolution is not an engineer.  It is not a person.  It cannot organize parts for a goal; it is completely a random, instantaneous response to immediate circumstances.  Evolutionists commit two fallacies with sickening frequency.  For one, they use evolution as an active verb, saying, for instance, that hearts evolved to pump blood.  That phrase evolved to is the fallacy: it implies goal-directed behavior.  Only intelligent agents direct things toward functional goals.  Matter in motion does not – nor do non-sentient living things.  The apparent goal-directed behavior of bacteria toward a chemical gradient or moths toward a light is an artifact of their design.  The organisms are not “deciding” to set goals and work toward achieving them.  When you see evolved to, or find design and evolution in the same sentence, red flags should go up.  The science and philosophy referees need to call a foul.    The second fallacy evolutionists commit is kind of like the anthropic principle in cosmology: “If the universe were not finely tuned for life, we wouldn’t be here to worry about the question.”  That’s a dodge, not an explanation.  It doesn’t explain why the universe is designed or how it got that way; it is an appeal to a counterfactual.  Similarly, natural selection theory implies that if the bird did not evolve a wing, it wouldn’t be flying; if the plant did not employ quantum mechanical light traps, it wouldn’t be harvesting light.  It does not follow that the bird did evolve the wing.  That would be the logical consequence only if evolution is assumed a priori to be the only option.  But it is not.  One cannot assume what needs to be proved (circular reasoning).  Since our uniform experience is that intelligent agents do engineering, intelligent design should be the default inference to the best explanation for wings, hearts and photosynthetic systems.    The item about Maxwell’s demon (#7 above) is noteworthy.  As the Second Law of Thermodynamics is sometimes defined, all natural systems increase in entropy.  We know that humans can overcome the law of increasing entropy (locally and temporarily) by exerting goal-directed work, such as in harnessing the chemical energy of gasoline (from sunlight) in a well-designed piston engine.  Is that natural?  If humans are natural products of evolution, then everything they do should be defined as natural.  That would mean, however, that decreasing entropy is also natural – a contradiction with the Second Law of Thermodynamics, a law of nature if there ever was one.  And what about the real-world Maxwell demons like ATP synthase motors, flagella and other Brownian ratchets that harness random thermal energy to perform useful work?  Are they natural?  It is only by making the word natural a self-contradictory concept, or by abandoning the universality of laws of nature, that a materialist can deny intelligent causes are at work in the universe and played a role in its origin.(Visited 24 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

SA a ‘promising investment destination’

first_img10 May 2013 South Africa is a promising investment destination, business executives from companies from around the world said on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum on Africa in Cape Town this week. “The [African] continent and particularly South Africa is a very promising, interesting destination for investments,” said Pedro Pereira da Silva, chief operating officer and country manager Poland and Portugal for Jeronimo Martins Dystrybucja. Pereira da Silva is one of over 600 business leaders attending the two-day forum, which ends on Friday. He said with Europe’s continuing gloomy outlook, the Portuguese food distribution and manufacturing group was looking at growing markets like Africa and South America to expand. The group has operations in Poland, Portugal and Colombia and is now looking to open offices in Africa.‘Africa as the next growth avenue’ “We are looking to Africa as the next growth avenue and we think it’s a very promising destination,” Pereira da Silva said. The chairperson of Indian mining and manufacturing group Ispat Corporation, Vinod Mittal, said his group was exploring various opportunities in mining and power generation in South Africa. “There is a lot of potential and we are focusing on this country. I think personally it’s quite good, very promising,” he said. South Africa had a sizeable market demand and its investment in the environment was promising, Mittal added. Group chairperson of the Azibo Group, Mayank Patel, said the UK financial services company was looking at expanding its operations in South Africa to the rest of Africa. The Azibo Group set up operations in South Africa seven years ago.A stepping stone “Where originally our growth and expansion plans had looked at traditional places like Europe and the US and Asia, now we realise that from a strategic perspective, that to grow and expand our business, we have to look at Africa as an expansion,” Patel said. “South Africa now is only a stepping stone for us to begin considering getting into other economies like Angola, Zambia, Nigeria, Ghana, so there are prospects and huge opportunities for us.” Patel said it hadn’t been easy launching operations in South Africa, but said that this was a likely experience for any company attempting to break into new markets anywhere in the world. “It’s one of those things that any place you go to, anywhere new you are going to, you have new cultures, you have to localise your business very quickly, but sometimes you can’t localise as fast as you want. It takes time but perseverance eventually pays off.” He pointed out that South Africa was well positioned time zone-wise with Europe, had a good financial services sector and was open to foreign influence and exposure. Source: SANews.gov.zalast_img read more

87th Ohio FFA Convention schedule

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The 87th Ohio FFA Convention will take place April 30th and May 1st this at the Ohio Expo Center. The event will welcome Ohio FFA members from across the state to rub shoulders with others wearing blue jackets. Students will take part in workshops, compete in contests, and be recognized for their achievements to name just a few things of what to expect over the two busy days in Columbus.Full coverage of the event will be provided from the 2015 Ohio Ag Net and Ohio’s Country Journal Student FFA Reporters.Here is a look at the convention’s schedule:THURSDAY, APRIL 30th7:30 am Set Up: Agriscience Fair, Proficiencies8:00 am Convention Registration – Celeste8:00 am National Chapter Interviews – Rhodes8:00 am Ag Issues CDE – FFA Center9:00 am Career Show & Expo – Bricker9:00 am Agriscience Fair Interviews – Bricker9:00 am Proficiency Interviews – Bricker9:00 am Ohio FFA Fights Hunger – ODOT1:00 pm Grain Merchandising Finals – Rhodes12:30 pm Recognition Luncheon  – Rhodes1:30 pm PRE-SESSION2 pm FIRST SESSIONOpening CeremonyTeacher/Administrator RecognitionChapter Trust AwardsFoundation Service ChaptersChildren’s Hospital RecognitionCROP/Church World Services RecognitionOhio FFA Fights Hunger RecognitionWashington Leadership Conference ScholarshipsRecognition of New FFA ChaptersKeynote Speaker – Curtis ZimmermanDelegate Business Meeting & Officer ElectionsClosing Ceremony5:30 pm Honorary Degree Dinner  – Rhodes6:30 pm PRE-SESSION7 pm SECOND SESSIONOpening CeremonyHonorary State FFA Degree CeremonyNational Winners RecognitionStar American FFA Degree RecognitionStar State FFA Degree RecognitionProficiency Award RecognitionWildlife through Fiber and/or Oil CropConcert – Keith AndersonClosing CeremonyFRIDAY, MAY 1st8:00 am Registration – Celeste9:00 am Career Show & Expo – Bricker9:00 am Choir Practice – Bricker9:00 am Band Practice – ODOT9:30 am PRE-SESSION10 am THIRD SESSIONOpening CeremonyChapter Awards• Ohio FFA Gold Medal Chapters• Top 10 Student Development Chapters• Top 10 Chapter Development Chapters• Top 10 Community Development Chapters• Top 10 ChaptersKeynote Speaker – Miss Ohio Mackenzie BartProficiency Award RecognitionEquine Science through AccountingClosing Ceremony1:00 pm Talent Show – Celeste2:30 pm PRE-SESSION3 pm FOURTH SESSIONOpening CeremonyCreed Speaking PresentationOfficer Awards• Secretary’s Award• Treasurer’s Award• Reporter’s AwardNational FFA Officer KeynoteState CDE RecognitionPrepared Speaking PresentationAgriscience Fair RecognitionOhio FFA Officers’ Parent RecognitionClosing Ceremony5:00 pm State FFA Degree Reception – ODOT5:00 pm Past Officer Reception – FFA Center5:00 pm Band and Chorus Musical Presentation6 pm PRE-SESSION6:30 pm FIFTH SESSIONOpening CeremonyBand and Chorus PresentationRemarks – Ohio FFA AlumniRetiring Address – State President, Sydney Snider2015-16 Ohio FFA Officer AnnouncementConferring of the State FFA DegreeOfficer InstallationClosing Ceremonylast_img read more

Maharashtra government formation | NCP to get Deputy Chief Minister post, Speaker will be from Congress

first_imgMaharashtra politics live | Top developments on November 27, 2019 Maharashtra poltics: Aaditya Thackeray and Rohit Pawar the centre of attraction as MLAs take oath Supporting BJP-led government was no revolt, says Ajit Pawar Mr. Ajit Pawar’s return to the State Cabinet was not confirmed till late in the night after a meeting of top leaders of the Shiv Sena, the NCP and the Congress was held for over four-and-a-half hours. The leaders clarified that the names of the Ministers will be announced only on Thursday morning.Maharashtra Chief Minister-designate Uddhav Thackeray, the senior and junior Pawars, along with top NCP leaders and senior leaders of the Congress from Delhi and Maharashtra, participated in the meeting to discuss the distribution of portfolios. NCP leader Praful Patel addressing a press conference after the meeting said one Deputy Chief Minister of the NCP will take oath along with Mr. Thackeray. “The post of Speaker will go to the Congress while the NCP will get the Deputy Speaker’s post,” he said.Also Read Two days after the failed rebellion to join hands with the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in a bid to form the government, Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) leader Ajit Pawar returned, addressing party MLAs at a meeting here on Wednesday.“I am with Sharad Pawar. I was always with him and the party. I have no complaint against anyone. Neither have I any ill will against anyone. There are no problems within the Pawar family,” said Mr. Ajit Pawar. On Tuesday night, Mr. Ajit Pawar had visited the house of his uncle and NCP president Sharad Pawar where both reportedly decided to let bygones be bygones. Also Read Mr. Patel clarified that the Cabinet expansion will take place after the government clears the trust vote in the Assembly.According to Mr. Patel, only two ministers of each party will take oath along with the CM and deputy CM. However, he did not announce the name of the deputy CM who will be taking oath along with Mr. Thackeray. Among the top contenders for the deputy CM post include NCP State president Jayant Patil. A group within the NCP is backing Mr. Ajit Pawar’s name for the same.Also Read According to sources, the bone of contention within the parties was the post of Speaker as the NCP was not ready to give the post to the Congress, especially former Chief Minister Prithviraj Chavan. The issue has now been sorted out.Late Wednesday night, Sena leader Aaditya Thackeray visited Congress president Sonia Gandhi thanking her for the support and also inviting her to the swearing-in ceremony, to be held on Thursday evening.Preparations for the swearing-in ceremony are in full swing. Sena MP Vinayak Raut said the party has invited 400 farmer families for the programme. In addition invitations have been sent to West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee and Delhi CM Arvind Kejariwal. Mr. Thackeray’s estranged cousin and Maharashtra Navnirman Sena (MNS chief Raj Thackeray is also likely to get an invite.last_img read more

NBA: Analyst Charles Barkley says it’s ‘stupid’ that Kyrie Irving wants to leave Cavs

first_imgKyrie Irving #2 of the Cleveland Cavaliers  (Jason Miller/Getty Images/AFP)NBA Hall of Famer Charles Barkley is not one to hold his tongue regarding issues in today’s NBA and he recently chimed in on Kyrie Irving’s supposed request to be traded from the Cleveland Cavaliers.READ: Cavs star Kyrie Irving reportedly requests tradeADVERTISEMENT Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Teenager upsets Nadal at Montreal Masters Was LeBron James’ tweet a shot at teammate Kyrie Irving?Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next NGCP on security risk: Chinese just technical advisers “When he was on a bad team and he was the man, I guarantee you that wasn’t a lot of fun for him,” he explained. “And now you want to leave the best player in the world. And listen, I hear all of this stuff about how LeBron casts a big shadow. He should cast a big shadow.”Barkley, meanwhile, certainly knows a thing or two about accepting a lesser role, as he joined fellow legends Hakeem Olajuwon and Clyde Drexler at the twilight of his career in the 1996-1997 season.Although Barkley acknowledges that at 25 Irving is still in his prime with his best days ahead of him, he further explained why winning a championship remains the most important thing.“You wanna share the glory. You wanna win. Right now, there’s only two, three, maybe four legitimate teams in the NBA,” he concluded. “If you’re not on one of those four or five teams, you’re really just wasting your time for seven months. So I don’t understand why you wouldn’t want to play with LeBron. Listen, I wanna play with LeBron now!”  Khristian Ibarrola /raRELATED STORY:ADVERTISEMENT DILG, PNP back suspension of classes during SEA Games View comments Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo The outspoken player-turned-analyst shared how baffled he was by the notion of Irving’s displeasure playing second fiddle to teammate LeBron James.“You want to be on a good team. You want to play with other great players. This notion where you want to be the man, I just think is so stupid,” he said during an interview on NBA TV, as relayed by Bleacher Report.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“If I got a chance to play with another great player, I want to do that. The objective is to win,” he said.The 1993 NBA MVP also recalled Irving’s early years with the Cavaliers while LeBron was still playing for the Miami Heat.center_img LATEST STORIES MOST READ Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’last_img read more

9 months agoMan Utd leave Alexis at home for Spurs trip

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man Utd leave Alexis at home for Spurs tripby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAlexis Sanchez is out of Manchester United’s squad for the trip to Tottenham.The Manchester Evening News says Sanchez was one of nine players missing from the United squad that travelled to London by train on Saturday.The Chilean limped out of his side’s 2-0 FA Cup win over Reading with a hamstring problem and doesn’t appear to have recovered in time.Chris Smalling, Eric Bailly, Antonio Valencia, Matteo Darmian and Marouane Fellaini were also missing.One man that has travelled is Paul Pogba. The Frenchman was initially a doubt for the fixture after picking up a knock against Reading. last_img

11 days agoHendrick admits no Europa League has helped Burnley

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Hendrick admits no Europa League has helped Burnleyby Freddie Taylor11 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveBurnley midfielder Jeff Hendrick has admitted that not needing to play in the Europa League is helping his side.The Clarets struggled last season as they had to cope with additional European games.It caused them to have a very poor start to the season, which lead to a relegation battle for much of the campaign.But they have started brighter this term, and Hendrick thinks he knows why.”We’ve progressed but I think last year was a bit different,” the midfielder told reporters.”I know it was frustrating for us as players and maybe the fans, staff and everyone.”At the start of the season, with the games we had, it was difficult, it was tiring.”I was talking to my friend at Wolves when we played them and I said, ‘How are you getting on with the European football?’ and he just said he’s constantly tired.”Without even knowing, the travelling does take it out of you and that’s what happened with us last year.”Even when we were out of that, we tried to pick the performances up, but it didn’t work.”Eventually we sat down, we all got on the same track and the performances started to pick up and we got some points on the board, which we did need at the back end of last year.” last_img read more

The 2015 MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference In 140 Seconds

We liveblogged Sloan, we wrote about what it was like to be a woman at Sloan, and now we have video and audio proof that the 2015 MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference happened. Here, in under 3 minutes, is what you missed at the world’s preeminent conference for people who love sports, data and every place they intersect:And here’s all the audio we recorded from the convention center:The State of Sports Analytics with Jonah Keri, Kirk Goldsberry, and Jody AvirganAudio Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/jonah_kirk_jody-at-sloan.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Live From Sloan: Kid Stats GeeksAudio Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/kidsatsloan.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Montage: Women at SloanAudio Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/womenatsloan.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.How Bayern Munich Wins With DataAudio Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/carl_bayernanalytics.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Live From Sloan: Houston Rockets GM Daryl MoreyAudio Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/flowers_morey.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Live From Sloan: Dean Oliver Of The Sacramento KingsAudio Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/carl_deanoliver.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. read more

Ohio State baseball wins 5th straight game takes down Xavier 103

The Ohio State baseball team celebrates its victory against Xavier March 19 at Bill Davis Stadium. OSU won, 10-3.Credit: Sam Harrington / Lantern photographerWith Big Ten play looming, the Ohio State baseball team appears to be starting to play their best ball of the season.Playing under a gray sky for most of the evening, the Buckeyes (13-6, 0-0) came out shining and rolled to their fifth-straight victory, defeating Xavier, 10-3, Wednesday.The game featured two freshman starting pitchers on the bump with the Musketeers’ (11-7, 0-0) Trent Astle going against the Buckeyes’ Tanner Tully.Tully, starting his first collegiate game, began with a commanding five-pitch first inning. Astle wasn’t so lucky.Sophomore infielder Troy Kuhn was batting first for the Buckeyes and, on the second pitch he saw, smacked a homerun over the left field wall. The shot was Kuhn’s fourth of the year, good enough to lead the team.“I’m seeing the ball real well,” Kuhn said. “I keep getting good pitches to hit … taking advantage of other teams mistakes.”With runners on second and third and still no outs, freshman outfielder Ronnie Dawson had an RBI groundout and sophomore infielder Zach Ratcliff followed with an RBI single to give the Buckeyes a quick 3-0 lead.Astle found himself in another jam to begin the second. With the bases loaded and nobody out, sophomore infielder Jacob Bosiokovic hit a sac fly to deep center that plated two. Junior outfielder Pat Porter followed with a sac fly of his own to score another and give Tully a six-run lead to work with.The freshman responded, going five innings with five hits on no runs scored. When Tully had Musketeers in scoring position, he turned up the heat to keep them at bay.“It was good just to go in there and throw strikes and keep the defense in it,” Tully said. “I throw a little bit harder, hit my spots a little bit more (with runners in scoring position) and make sure they don’t score.”Coach Greg Beals was impressed enough with Tully’s first start to say he would probably be the Sunday starter this weekend.“There was no question in my mind he was capable of starting and capable of doing what he did,” Beals said. “To put five zeros up like that, though, was sure good to see … in our meeting tomorrow there’s a pretty good chance we decide Tanner Tully is our Sunday starter this weekend.”The Musketeers scored one in the sixth and two more in eighth to give them a chance, but the offense rose to the occasion and responded with four runs of their own in the eighth.Redshirt-senior reliever Tyler Giannonatti recorded the final four outs to give him his first save of the season and keep the Buckeyes perfect at home so far.The win streak has been an enjoyable one for the Buckeyes, but they know it isn’t time to get complacent.“We’re pretty happy (with where we are), but this is where our mission starts,” Kuhn said. “We want to come out hot.”The Buckeyes are next scheduled to Friday when the Michigan State Spartans come to town. First pitch at Bill Davis Stadium is set for 6:05 p.m. read more