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Letterkenny estates targeted by rock-throwing youths

first_imgHouses in several Letterkenny estates were damaged by groups of youths throwing what have been described as ‘rocks or stones’.Between last Tuesday and Saturday, April 9-13, between 6-10.30pm, houses at Dr McGinley Road, Beechwood Road, Long Lane and Meadowbank were targeted.Houses had windows either cracked or smashed in the attacks It is understood that a ‘small group’ of youths were responsible.On the items thrown, Garda Rafferty said: “They’re big enough and were thrown with enough force to break the windows.”Garda Rafferty urged parents to be vigilant and know the whereabouts of their children.Letterkenny estates targeted by rock-throwing youths was last modified: April 16th, 2019 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Beechwood RoadDr McGinley RoadGardailetterkennyLong LaneMeadowbanklast_img read more

Will Evolutionary Psychology Be the First Darwinian Theory to Go?

first_imgEvolutionary psychologists are not getting much respect these days.  Some evolutionists, like Stephen Jay Gould and Richard Lewontin, criticized them for years.  Now, a new book came out against them and Science gave it a good review.1  To turn a Darwinian phrase, reviewer Johan J. Bolhuis said that the field of evolutionary psychology is undergoing negative selection pressure.    The book under review also turned a Darwinian phrase in its title, Evolutionary Psychology as Maladapted Psychology, by Robert C. Richardson, a philosopher of science.  Bolhuis, a member of the Behavioral Biology Group at Utrecht University, tied this maligned field to Charles Darwin right in the first sentence: “As we approach the 150th anniversary of the publication of On the Origin of Species, the theory of evolution is still not without controversy in the popular domain.”  It seemed logical to many to extend Darwin’s theory of evolution to cognition, “as Darwin himself did in The Descent of Man when he considered human characteristics such as morality or emotions to have been evolved.”    Both the author and reviewer accept evolution, and assent to the claim that our “psychological capacities are evolved traits.”  Nevertheless, they have problems seeing evolutionary psychology as a scientific enterprise.  Its flaws include:Blind reasoning:  It is questionable “whether particular human cognitive traits, such as language or human reasoning, can be seen as adaptations.”Tunnel vision:  Evolutionary psychologists tend to see everything in selectionist terms.  “The main problem with evolutionary psychology is that it usually does not consider alternative explanations but takes the assumption of adaptation through natural selection as given.”Blind zeal:  Enthusiasm by the proponents of evolutionary psychology outruns their science.  “Evolutionary psychologists often argue for their proposals with a zest and enthusiasm that seems to convey the message that we can only understand the human mind if we consider our evolutionary history.”Blind speculation:  The inability to find evidence for that history renders evolutionary psychology little more than storytelling.  For example, they say that human language evolved because of a functional demand in social groups.  Richardson, however, claims “we simply lack the historical evidence for a reconstruction of the evolution of human cognition.”On this last point, Bolhuis wound up for a knockout punch:Richardson rightly suggests that paleontologists are unlikely to unearth the evidence that can inform us about the social structure of our ancestral communities.  I think one can go a step further.  Even if we would be able to muster the evidence needed for an evolutionary psychological analysis of human cognition, it would not tell us anything about our cognitive mechanisms.  The study of evolution is concerned with a historical reconstruction of traits.  It does not, and cannot, address the mechanisms that are involved in the human brain.  Those fall within the domains of neuroscience and cognitive psychology.  In that sense, evolutionary psychology will never succeed, because it attempts to explain mechanisms by appealing to the history of these mechanisms.  To use the author’s words, “We might as well explain the structure of orchids in terms of their beauty.”Bolhuis ranked this book as excellent.  Combining this book with David Buller’s 2005 critique Adapting Minds (see 04/28/2005), he said, “the two books are complementary, and together they constitute a formidable critique of evolutionary psychology.”  Richardson in particular, he said in conclusion, “shows very clearly that attempts at reconstruction of our cognitive history amount to little more than ‘speculation disguised as results.’”    Bolhuis joked that Richardson is piling on the “selection pressure” against evolutionary psychology.  Presumably, he meant that Richardson did it intelligently by design.1.  Johan J. Bolhuis, “Piling on the Selection Pressure,” Science, 6 June 2008: Vol. 320. no. 5881, p. 1293, DOI: 10.1126/science.1157403.This is great.  Evolutionists are getting bold enough to criticize evolutionary psychologists in a pro-evolutionary science journal.  Progress is being made.    Now, all we have to do is point out to these people that the evolutionary biologists commit the same errors: assuming that adaptation implies evolution, refusing to consider alternative explanations, propounding their faith with zest and enthusiasm instead of evidence, telling stories about an inaccessible history, and disguising speculation as results.  What’s the difference?    If the evolutionists continue to work up the nerve to falsify each other, the whole Darwin castle might implode without an attack from outside.  Future archaeologists can study the ruins and help students learn from history that bad ideas eventually collapse from within.  Maybe the Darwin Bicentennial will turn out to be a moment of silence.(Visited 33 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

South Africa in the Washington Post

first_imgThe front page of South Africa Now, produced for Brand South Africa and published as a supplement in the 6 October 2010 edition of the prestigious Washington Post. (Click to enlarge.)RELATED ARTICLES • Brand South Africa in Davos • Brand Africa – by Africa for Africa • Brand South Africa appoints CEOSouth Africa’s unique mix of energy, humanity, sheer doggedness and knack for problem-solving are showcased in a six-page supplement in the prestigious Washington Post newspaper, titled South Africa Now and produced on behalf of Brand South Africa.The supplement hit the streets of Washington, DC, in the 6 October 2010 edition of the newspaper. It features contributions by Professor Anton Harber, Caxton chair of journalism at Wits University, veteran journalists Simon Barber and John Battersby, AngloGold Ashanti CEO Mark Cutifani, South African Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe, US ambassador to South Africa Donald Gips, Jann Turner, the director of hit South African movie White Wedding, and Miller Matola, CEO of Brand South Africa.Barber, who is also the Washington-based US country manager for Brand South Africa, commissioned Big Media to produce South Africa Now, and edited it in collaboration with Mary Alexander, the former editor of MediaClubSouthAfrica.com.“With my background as a journalist, I have tended to question the value of supplements like these, figuring they would mostly go unread and land up on the bottom of birdcages,” said Barber.“Recently, however, Bric nations such as Russia and China started doing supplements in the Washington Post that were actually interesting to read, so I began to have second thoughts. What clinched the deal for me was knowing I could enlist the talents of Big Media’s writers, editors and designers.“I was confident we could put together something that was truly reflective of Brand South Africa and which would get read not just by Washington decision makers but by the captains of global finance who would be in Washington for the IMF/World Bank annual meetings when we published.”Printed in full colour, South Africa Now features photography from the MediaClubSouthAfrica.com image library as well as a stunning American-style op-ed illustration by multi-award-winning South African graphic journalist Francois Smit.The supplement was designed by Irwin Manoim, creative director at Big Media. A newspaper production and design expert with 30 years in the industry, Manoim is a joint founder and former editor of both the Mail & Guardian and the electronic Mail & Guardian, the first online newspaper in Africa and one of the few and pioneering mid-1990s web-based newspapers in the world.“The message of South Africa Now is that South Africa matters, that it’s a country of smart, creative people who have their own ways of doing things and who are making a difference globally,” said Barber.The supplement leads with an exploration of South Africa’s ambitious efforts to balance a growing economy with the need to curb greenhouse-gas emissions, with the most recent example being plans for a huge, US$21-billion, 5,000 megawatt solar park and a smaller solar installation on the island where Nelson Mandela was once jailed.The front page also features a look at Soweto, a book by Jodie Bieber, the South African photographer now most famous for the now-iconic and shocking Time magazine cover featuring the mutilated face of 18-year-old Afghani girl Aisha.Elsewhere in the supplement Motlanthe looks at Africa’s place in the new economic world order, and Cutifani examines why South Africa’s past makes it a good place to do business in the future. Harber discusses media freedom in South Africa, Matola reports on efforts to fix Africa’s brand, and Turner writes about the “normal, crazy, mixed-up country” that inspired White Wedding.Want to read more? Download South Africa Now in PDF format (2.2 MB), or read selected articles online:Powering towards a green economySouth Africa plans to build a massive $21.8-billion, 5 000 MW solar park in its semi-desert Northern Cape province as part of an aggressive push to grow its highly industrialised economy without increasing its carbon footprint.The everyday beauty of SowetoSouth African photographer Jodi Bieber has a special ability to bring out the beauty in the ordinary, even the disfigured. On the cover of Time magazine she made a mutilated Afghani girl look beautiful, and in her latest book Soweto she makes everyday township life shine.Launchpad to a billion consumersBy offering to acquire Massmart for some $4.2-billion, Wal-Mart has joined the parade of global companies looking to South Africa as a springboard into what is increasingly seen as the world’s last great investment frontier.A trek to the start of timeIt will probe the edges of our universe. It will be a virtual time machine, helping scientists explore the origins of galaxies. It’s the Square Kilometre Array, and South Africans are at the heart of its development.Brewing up a global brandMiller Lite. Tastes great. Less filling. And brought to you by world-beating South African company SABMiller.Looking south and east for growthAs the shift in global economic power gains momentum, South Africa’s trade is moving eastwards and southwards in a pattern that both reflects the worldwide trend and helps drive it, writes John Battersby.More than just a celluloid Mandela There is a special bond between Hollywood actor Morgan Freeman and the man he played in the Clint Eastwood movie Invictus, South African statesman Nelson Mandela.Africa in the new world orderKgalema Motlanthe, South Africa’s deputy president, looks at how African economies’ resilient performance during the global financial crisis points to the continent’s new place in a changing world.Mining history for new solutionsMark Cutifani, CEO of the multinational AngloGold Ashanti mining company, examines why South Africa’s past is key to successfully doing business here in the future.Turning up the media volumeSince 1990, South Africa has been a noisy place. After decades of apartheid censorship, the lifting of restrictions on the media led to a cacophony of debate. For the first time in centuries, everyone could be heard, and it was sometimes deafening, writes Anton Harber.A joule of an energy-efficient carSouth Africa, which builds BMWs and Mercedes Benzes for the US market, is in the thick of the race to deliver a truly practical – and stylish – electric car. Meet the Joule.South Africa: Time to believeThe forgiving philosophy of “ubuntu” helps explain how South Africa managed to transcend its turbulent apartheid past and create a unified democracy, writes Simon Barber.Finding sound real estate investmentSouth Africa’s post-apartheid transformation and new middle class are fuelling demand for affordable homes. For private equity fund International Housing Solutions, that means opportunity.My normal, crazy, mixed-up countrySouth African hit movie White Wedding is now showing in the US to rave reviews. Jann Turner, who directed and jointly wrote and produced the film, writes about the place that inspired it – South Africa.Bring on the braaiAll South Africans love it – including Nobel peace prize-winning Desmond Tutu – and its rich, smoky smell floats over the country every Sunday. Celebrate the braai with our great recipe for making boerewors, traditional South African farmer’s sausage.last_img read more

Weekend Reading: 17 Rules by David Russo

first_imgRelated Posts For entrepreneurs trying to form a startup, one of the first challenges they face that persists throughout the businesses life is how to find and keep talented partners and employees. From finding that first co-founder to finding the prolific programmers to fill your ranks later down the line, talent acquisition is always a major step in any business. Just look at some of the deals that have gone down in the Valley; Facebook didn’t buy FriendFeed for their technology, that deal was mostly about getting FriendFeed’s talented employees on the Facebook team.A new book from author David Russo, 17 Rules Successful Companies Use to Attract and Keep Top Talent: Why Engaged Employees Are Your Greatest Sustainable Advantage, seeks to make this process more clear for businesses. Russo is the CEO of Eno River Associates, Inc., which is a consulting service that helps business executives build better team relationships. Their portfolio of clients includes American Express, Johnson & Johnson, and the CIA. With his new book, Russo outlines the key strategies he has learned over the years as a consultant and human resources executive that has helped him and others create winning teams. The book doesn’t waste any time getting into its 17 rules; after a brief introduction the entirety of the book consists of one chapter per rule. The rules cover a broad base of topics, including the more straightforward rule #4, “Provide Ample and Appropriate Resources,” to the more abstract rule #12, “Understand Human Capital.” One of the key rules that sticks out to me is #3, “Cultivate Leadership, Not Management, and Know the Difference!” “Whereas managers administrate, leaders have the power to influence, to motivate, even inspire, and those are distinctly different traits,” writes Russo. “Indeed, true leadership is the ability to display attributes that make people want to follow.”Russo points out that leaders need to have passion, vision, and energy, as well as recognize that each employee has value to the success of the business. He likens this value to a tight end in a football game running “a crisp pattern” and distracting the defense despite knowing before the play that he’s not going to be the ball carrier. Another rule which will likely strike a chord with the startup culture is #10, “Make Room for Fun in the Workplace (Nurture Lightheatedness/Levity).” Anyone who has seen the popular workplace movie “Office Space” knows what a bland work environment can do to employees spirits, but I don’t think we have to worry about startups not having enough fun on the job. Aside from being passionate about the job they’re doing, most startup employees are probably used to everyday being “casual Friday” and taking a brain break in a game room. Granted, not every experience is like this, but we all know that many startups are a very relaxed environment, which Russo says is very important for attracting skilled employees and keeping them happy.Other important rules Russo includes on his list include knowing how and when to “cheerlead,” acknowledging and rewarding efforts and contributions, and the lastly, telling the truth. While this book isn’t aimed directly at startups, young entrepreneurs looking to lead their team to success should certainly take a look at this book. One of reasons I would suggest it is that at times, young entrepreneurs who have little or no workplace experience are suddenly thrust into a CEO role. If your company takes off, you might be in charge of a lot of people very quickly, and this book will certainly help keep them happy.Disclosure: A review copy of 17 Rules was provided to ReadWriteWeb by Pearson Education, Inc.Photo by Flickr user madebytess. chris cameron A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#start#startups last_img read more

Doc Sign Brings PDF Signing to iPhone

first_img4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App Tags:#biz#Reviews 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout A new iPhone application called Doc Sign enables users to manage and sign PDF documents from their phones.Doc Sign can open PDF files attached to incoming emails, from a public URL or the via Drop.io file sharing service. The user can then touch any part of the document and add text or write their signature, then save and email it back or transfer it to their desktop via iTunes.The app does not currently support PDFs from Google Docs, but this feature is being planned for in a future version. In the meantime, users can work around this limitation by emailing files to themselves. Doc Sign, which was released by Crowded Road last month, is not the first application to bring PDF signing to the iPhone, but it does have some features that attempt to set it apart from the competition. “Unlike some similar products, Doc Sign is a pure app, not relying on any website or web-service,” says Adam Korbl, founder and CEO of Crowded Road. “We do not store or pass user documents through our servers whatsoever. This not only avoids any reliability issues that can arise as a result of server failures, but it also ensures superior privacy and document security, something essential for any enterprise-level application.”While the application will work on older versions of the iPhone, says Korbl, Apple’s new iOS4 is recommended for the best user experience. Doc Sign is not yet available for other devices, but Crowded Road is working on versions for the iPad and Android. Disclosure: We received a free version of this app in order to test it. center_img 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… john paul titlow Related Posts last_img read more

[Poll] Has Apple Gone Too Far?

first_imgTags:#Apple#mobile#Poll What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … dan rowinski Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Related Posts center_img Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology The rise of Apple as the darling of the technology industry was a decade in the making. The company had fallen on hard times before its co-founder and guru Steve Jobs came back in 1997 and redefined what Apple computers stood for.A decade later, in 2007, Apple released the iPhone, and love for the company as well as its revenue have skyrocketed since. But will the litany of lawsuits coming out of Cupertino, finally sour public opinion?The iPhone and iPad are two of the best-selling consumer-electronics products of all time. Each iteration leads Apple’s sales to greater heights. To many, Apple can do no wrong.They think that every decision is right, every mistake is someone else’s fault. Others have come before. Research In Motion’s BlackBerry was once so ubiquitous and heavily used in businesses that it earned the nickname “crackberry.” Nokia was a dominant global cellphone maker for years. Both companies now struggle, their once loyal customers likely toting iPhones right now. Poor decisions and bad timing led to their downfalls. The same fate is not coming to Apple soon. The company enjoys undeniable momentum, having sparked the global market for smartphones and tablets. The true mobile-computing revolution, however, has not been the technology, but the market Apple created. To protect its market and thought leadership, Apple has turned to the legal system. The company owns a clutch of patents for the design and functionality of touchscreen computers and it is using these patent to beat its competitors, if possible, into surrender.Apple has sued Samsung, HTC and Motorola in courts around the world. New patent claims are filed by Apple and other companies in the mobile industry so regularly that it is hard to keep up. The current case in point is the battle being fought between Apple and Samsung in a California court. Apple claims that Samsung willfully copied the design and functionality of the iPhone, and is asking for billions of dollars in damages. An Apple win here could set a precedent that leaves other companies vulnerable to Apple patent claims. But the courtroom battles are straining the affections of buyers and the trade media. Comments on Apple/Samsung articles that we have published are more vitriolic than usual even if Apple still has phalanxes of staunch, vocal supporters.Apple-bashing is not a new phenomenon. Yet more people are questioning Apple’s motives and whether it is still a mobile innovator.  “Apple is a technology-recipe company,” said Logan Hale from the Web show Tek Syndicate. “They take interesting things that other people have done and they add a little garlic, maybe some cilantro, and then say, blam, this is lovely.” Hale said the product “is delicious, and you like it, and then you run around to most of your friends and say ‘look at what Apple has invented.’ Well, they have not invented most of those things.”Have your opinions of Apple changed? Has it become a bully? Can it still innovate? Let us know in the comments. last_img read more

23 days agoFerdinand hails ‘perfect performance’ from Chelsea defender Tomori

first_imgFerdinand hails ‘perfect performance’ from Chelsea defender Tomoriby Paul Vegas23 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United legend Rio Ferdinand is convinced by the potential of Chelsea defender Fikayo Tomori.Ferdinand knows a thing or two about good defending – and he saw that in abundance from Tomori in Chelsea’s Champions League win over Lille.He enthused: “Huge talent. I think tactically Frank has got an A+ today because the pace on the counter attack from the Lille front men was there for all to see.”That was the best defender on the pitch actually setting up the first goal.”Everything he did today defensively I thought he was perfect.”His tenacity, his anticipation, his willingness to step out and make quick decisions to intercept.”He notices the danger, he’s running past people to get back to make an effort for his team. That’s what you want to see from young players.”The best bit is one-v-one. He’s saying, ‘Go on, you try and run past me.’ That’s what you want from your centre-half.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Nike Releases New Uniforms For Kentucky, Duke, Syracuse, Florida, Arizona, Oregon, UConn And Baylor

first_imgAn overhead shot of Rupp Arena during a game.LEXINGTON, KY – NOVEMBER 14: A general view of the Kentucky Wildcats game against the Grand Canyon Antelopes at Rupp Arena on November 14, 2014 in Lexington, Kentucky. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)We’re just one month away from March Madness, so naturally, the apparel manufacturers are starting to debut new uniforms for the top college basketball teams. Nike unveiled eight new uniforms Friday – six for men’s teams, two for women’s teams.The men’s squads for Kentucky, Duke, Syracuse, Florida, Arizona and Oregon got new Nike Hyper Elite’s for the stretch run. UConn and Baylor’s women’s teams were were also part of the release. A number of teams, including the Blue Devils, will debut them this weekend. From Nike:Each school’s home uniform will feature a white base with school-specific color lettering and a 26-degree speed graphic of an iconic symbol of each school across the side of the game short. The 26-degree angle of each school’s graphic was inspired by the chevron on the classic Nike Windrunner track jacket that debuted in 1978. Each graphic represents a distinctive basketball point of view, based on the roughly 1,000 directional changes, or “cuts” that a player might make in the course of a game.Here are some shots of the new digs.New Nike uniforms for Kentucky, Duke, Syracuse, Florida, Arizona, Oregon, UConn, & Baylor pic.twitter.com/q6HykfdiCr— Heidi Burgett (@heidiburgett) February 20, 2015Road to March is paved with @nikebasketball Hyper Elite Unis for 8 teams. Debuting this wkd. http://t.co/7ryu7iCz2S pic.twitter.com/cgXspbt3yA— Brian Strong (@briangstrong) February 20, 2015The new Disruption uniform set from Nike! Will wear when Syracuse visits Cameron. pic.twitter.com/sV0EvMGWod— Duke Basketball (@dukeblueplanet) February 20, 2015Check out the brand new @Nike Hyper Elite uniforms we will wear vs. Virginia on Senior Day 3/2! #CuseMode pic.twitter.com/qjz5Fdb6MB— Syracuse Basketball (@Cuse_MBB) February 20, 2015College basketball fans – what do you think?last_img read more

UGA Basketball Coach Mark Fox Will Join The Spike Squad For Saturday’s Football Game

first_imgGeorgia spike squad seen with basketball coach Mark Fox.georgia spike squad mark foxGeorgia basketball coach Mark Fox has always made it clear how much he supports the school’s football team. Saturday, he’ll be going all out, yet again, to help cheer on the Dawgs against SEC juggernaut Alabama.Friday, Fox, on Twitter, revealed that he’ll be joining the Spike Squad in the stands for the contest. The Spike Squad is notorious for wearing body paint and spiked shoulder pads to games.…& forgive me when I drip paint on you cause I’m #100%Dawg @UGASPIKESQUAD – I’m in! Time to GATA pic.twitter.com/ldchIG1e2q— Mark Fox (@coachmarkfox) October 2, 2015This isn’t the first time Fox has done this, and it probably won’t be the last. Very cool.last_img

Documents show how Liberals put abortion summer jobs on collision course

first_imgOTTAWA – It was February 2017 when the first letter about anti-abortion groups and the Canada Summer Jobs program landed in Labour Minister Patty Hajdu’s office.The Abortion Rights Coalition of Canada wanted Hajdu to keep crisis pregnancy centres — which offer an anti-abortion spin on pregnancy counselling — from getting summer-jobs funding. Applications were already being reviewed, and the centres were likely on the list, the letter warned.There was no response.Not until April of that year — when media reports emerged about a rookie Liberal MP who approved $56,000 in funding for an anti-abortion group in her riding in 2016 — did the issue seem to catch Hajdu’s attention.Since then, there has been no shortage of media attention paid to the Liberal government’s efforts to screen organizations applying for Canada Summer Jobs money, blocking any that refuse to attest that neither they nor the summer jobs in question would support an anti-abortion agenda.On Tuesday, Hajdu launched the 2018 version of the program, playing down any issues with the employer declaration by saying that faith-based groups had accessed funding. The Employment and Social Development Canada website shows hundreds of churches among the employers approved for funding this year, along with faith-based camps.Hajdu said the Canada Summer Jobs program was about the students, despite the attention paid to protesting groups.“Canadians expect us to be thoughtful about how we run programs and that we make sure that especially for these first jobs for kids, that they are with organizations that respect the fundamental rights of Canadians and don’t ask them to do things that are essentially looking to undermine those rights,” Hajdu said.“We made that commitment to Canadians that we would do this and that’s exactly what we’re doing.”The evolution of the Liberals’ policy that stoked concerns from religious groups is laid out in some 200 pages of documents obtained by The Canadian Press under the Access of Information Act or provided by groups, along with interviews with stakeholders and government officials, some speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss private conversations.A briefing note from August shows Hajdu had already directed the department to come up with the new employer declaration to ensure funding went to groups with “mandates that are consistent with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and court decisions.” Hajdu needed to approve the final wording before the fall, the note said.Her department crafted several pages of legal advice, all of it blocked from release on the grounds of solicitor-client privilege.The Abortion Rights Coalition of Canada, meanwhile, was getting only radio silence from Hajdu’s office.“We didn’t know what was really going on,” said Joyce Arthur, the coalition’s executive director.“Then, in December, they suddenly announced this attestation requirement. At the time we didn’t really know why they chose that solution, but we thought, ‘Whatever works’.”The new requirements appeared to come out of nowhere, said one government official, who described initial political trepidation about the eligibility rules.Faith-based groups howled in protest, saying they violated religious and free-speech rights. Hajdu and Liberal MPs defended the wording of the declaration.One Toronto-area Liberal MP wrote to a complainant, saying that while individuals could disagree with the declaration, “freedom of religion is an individual right and is not something which can be superimposed on an organization.”Religious leaders who met with Hajdu in late March left with the impression there might be some movement on the wording, but a government official said Hajdu only agreed to a review and gave no hint that the language dealing specifically with reproductive rights would be removed.Hajdu said Thursday she is looking to clarify language in the application form and guide that clears up concerns from groups and lets the government meet its policy objectives.In the meantime, Arthur’s organization plans to pore over the full list of this year’s employers to see if any of the hundreds of groups in their database have been approved for funding.Hajdu also said the department is working with employers who are concerned that increases in provincial minimum wages in provinces like Ontario may force them to cut back on hours offered to summer students.— Follow @jpress on Twitterlast_img read more