Month: August 2019

Panasonics Sialloy anode technology to offer 30 increase in battery capacity

first_img Citation: Panasonic’s Si-alloy anode technology to offer 30% increase in battery capacity (2010, March 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-03-panasonic-si-alloy-anode-technology-battery.html Increasing Electric Car Battery Performance This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Namely, the batteries, which measure 18mm in diameter and 65 mm in length, will offer a 4.0Ah capacity – that’s almost 30% higher than the largest capacity (3.1Ah) of today’s batteries of the same size. Panasonic plans to use the batteries primarily in notebook PCs, in which the Si-alloy anode makes it possible to cut the volume of a standard notebook PC battery pack by about half. Panasonic also hinted at using the batteries in vehicles in the future, although the battery’s weight will have to be reduced. Si-alloy’s attraction lies in its high theoretical capacity, which is at least 10 times greater than the capacity of graphite. However, one of the greatest challenges in developing Si-alloy-anode batteries is increasing their short charge/discharge cycle lifetime. During charge and discharge, the batteries have a large volumetric change of about 400%, which decreases their lifetime. With improved fabrication techniques and other modifications, Panasonic claims to have reduced the deterioration caused by the volumetric change. The company says that its Si-alloy-anode batteries can still maintain at least 80% capacity after 500 charge/discharge cycles. As the tech news site Nikkei notes, Panasonic’s commercial launch should further accelerate the Si-alloy development competition. Si-alloy anodes could accelerate the rate of increase of battery capacity. Capacity has been increasing at about 11% annually until now, but this new development represents an annual increase of 18%. Credit: Panasonic. More information: via: Nikkei Electronics © 2010 PhysOrg.com Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — One promising modification to next-generation rechargeable Li-ion batteries involves using Si-alloy anodes instead of graphite, which is currently the most common anode material. Many battery manufacturers are developing Si-alloy anodes, with Hitachi Maxell having previously announced plans to begin volume production by the end of fiscal 2009. Now, with its announcement of beginning volume production in 2012, Panasonic is the first company to reveal specifications of its Si-alloy anode product.last_img read more

Authors explore security threat of covert acoustical mesh networks in air

first_img(Phys.org) —”If we want to exploit a rigorously hardened and tested type of computing system or networks of this type of computing system, we have to break new ground. Covert channels are communication channels utilizing means for communications that have not been designed for communication at all.” So begins a bracing paper published last month in the Journal of Communications. Titled “On Covert Acoustical Mesh Networks in Air,” the paper discusses devices that can support stealthy communication preventing immediate detection of the covert channels. The authors, Michael Hanspach and Michael Goetz, are research associates at the Fraunhofer Institute for Communication, Information Processing and Ergonomy (FKIE), in Wachtberg, Germany. Explore further More information: Research paper: On Covert Acoustical Mesh Networks in Air, www.jocm.us/index.php?a=show&catid=124&id=600 The authors warned that “Acoustical networking as a covert communication technology is a considerable threat to computer security and might even break the security goals of high assurance computing systems based on formally verified micro kernels that did not consider acoustical networking in their security concept.” Researchers in the past have described acoustic wave propagation used in underwater setups but the authors in their research did something different. “The underlying network stack is based on a communication system that was originally designed for robust underwater communication. We adapt the communication system to implement covert and stealthy communications by utilizing the near ultrasonic frequency range. We further demonstrate how the scenario of covert acoustical communication over the air medium can be extended to multi-hop communications and even to wireless mesh networks.”The authors showed that establishing covert acoustical mesh networks in air is feasible in setups with commonly available business laptops. (The authors noted that a covert acoustical mesh network can be conceived as a botnet or malnet that is accessible via nearfield audio communications.) For their experimental setup, they used five laptops as the mesh network participants. They installed Debian 7.1 on each laptop. Commenting on their work, Dan Goodin of Ars Technica said the new research shows that “high-frequency networking is easily within the grasp of today’s malware.” In an email, Hanspach said that commonly available laptops can communicate over their internal speakers and microphones, and form a covert acoustical mesh network. Over that network, “information can travel over multiple hops of infected nodes, connecting completely isolated computing systems and networks (e.g., the internet) to each other.”The authors, in their paper, also discussed countermeasures against covert acoustical mesh networks. These include the use of lowpass filtering in computing systems and a host-based intrusion detection system for analyzing audio input and output to detect irregularities. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Scenario for a multi-hop acoustical keylogger. Credit: Michael Hanspach and Michael Goetz Research finds new channels to trigger mobile malware Citation: Authors explore security threat of covert acoustical mesh networks in air (2013, December 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-12-authors-explore-threat-covert-acoustical.html © 2013 Phys.orglast_img read more

When will we know we have found extraterrestrial life

first_img © 2015 Phys.org Do micro-organisms explain features on comets? Kee noted that we are able in any realistic sense to detect only life forms that have a terrestrial-based biochemistry, so we would probably bet on bodies that have liquid water and some form of geological free energy source. He puts his hopes on space probes looking at out-of-equilibrium gas distributions in exo-planetary atmospheres. However, any potential findings revealed by these probes would be only an indication, without the capability to definitively determine the existence of alien lifeforms.We could also turn to meteorites in the ongoing search for E.T. and hope that these rocks came from a parent body that may have harbored life. If we’re lucky, relics of life are contained within that sample and have not been destroyed. Kee surprisingly admits that luck is really the key condition here.”As most of these relics are likely to have been fossilized in some way, we would need to cash in on some more luck so that we can demonstrate sufficient differences between such relics and potential abiotic mechanisms of formation on earth—chemical compositional differences, isotopic ratio’s mineral morphologies or, most valuable perhaps, presence of specific molecules which could only be produced by biogenic processes, etcetera,” he said.The biggest challenge is to clearly identify if the life forms existed on the studied meteorites a long time prior to re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere. Before that is established, any new finding would be just a potential signature of extraterrestrial life. For example, in 2011, Richard B. Hoover, an astrobiologist of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, claimed he had found the remains of living organisms from a parent celestial body in a rare class of meteorites, called CI1 carbonaceous chondrites.”The complex filaments found embedded in the CI1 carbonaceous meteorites represent the remains of indigenous microfossils of cyanobacteria,” Hoover claimed.His team used Environmental (ESEM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to analyze the meteorite samples, studying internal surfaces. For comparison, Hoover compared the samples to those of terrestrial minerals and biological materials.Hoover’s claims sparked controversy and NASA distanced from his conclusions, pointing out his lack of expert peer reviews. The findings were soon debunked after publication.More recently, two scientists suggested that the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which is studied by the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft, hosts microbial alien life. The University of Buckingham’s Chandra Wickramasinghe and his colleague, Max Wallis of the University of Cardiff, insist that the characteristic features on the comet, including a black, carbon-containing crust and underlying ice; large, smooth ‘seas’; flat-bottomed craters and a surface peppered with mega-boulders, might only be explained by the presence of life.But the last week’s claims also sparked skepticism among other scientists specializing in the search for extraterrestrial life, debunking the newly presented hypothesis. The researchers rejecting the new findings emphasize that complex organics are generated in many places in the solar system through photochemistry and this is evidence for anything other than abiotic chemistry.So far, we haven’t found any convincing proof of alien life embedded in meteorites. However, Kee, undeterred by the long-lasting search and continuous skepticism, is looking to the future with hope.”In order to receive Willy Wonka’s Golden Ticket of Astrobiology, we would need to be ready to search as many meteorites as we can get hold of, which we already do. Overall, I reckon we would need to be lucky. But hey, many people have won the lottery. The trick is to keep buying the tickets,” Kee concluded. Explore further (Phys.org)—As we become more advanced in astronomy, continuously searching and finding lots of potentially habitable extrasolar planets that could harbor alien life, it seems that it’s not a matter of if but when we will find extraterrestrial organisms. However, the real tough problem here is: How we could determine if the alien life has really been found? “The question is not so much ‘when will we find extraterrestrial life?’ But ‘when will we know we have found extraterrestrial life?'” Terence Kee, the President of the Astrobiology Society of Britain told Phys.org. “My feeling is that we may indeed find signs of life in a few decades, but whether we will be unambiguously able to identify it as ‘extraterrestrial life’ – as opposed to terrestrial contamination or abiotic far-from-equilibrium processes – in such a short time-frame, I’m not so sure.”center_img This is the “South Pillar” region of the star-forming region called the Carina Nebula. Like cracking open a watermelon and finding its seeds, the infrared telescope “busted open” this murky cloud to reveal star embryos tucked inside finger-like pillars of thick dust. Credit: NASA Citation: When will we know we have found extraterrestrial life? (2015, July 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-07-extraterrestrial-life.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

EndPermian mass extinction may have been driven by an ocean teeming with

first_img Citation: End-Permian mass extinction may have been driven by an ocean teeming with life (2015, August 7) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-08-end-permian-mass-extinction-driven-ocean.html Scientists have speculated that during the Permian period, venting of oceanic hydrogen sulfide gas killed off most eukaryotes and allowed oceanic prokaryotes to flourish. An international collaborative of researchers has conducted an analysis of the chemistry embedded in oceanic geologic formations, providing new geochemical evidence for this theory. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, links the end-Permian mass extinction event with climate change, geologic weathering, and widespread marine anoxia as a result of biogeochemical sulfur and carbon cycles.The reduction of sulfates in the ocean by microbes is an important pillar of the sulfur cycle. Most of the hydrogen sulfide in the ocean is reoxidized, with a fraction buried in sediment. Release from the sediment is another important factor, affecting sulfide formation and reactive iron availability. A notable increase in hydrogen sulfide would have affected the oceanic environment in a host of complex ways, creating major changes in biodiversity.The current study demonstrates successive enhanced organic matter degradation by microbial sulfate reduction. This produces hydrogen sulfide, which is toxic for most eukaryotes, killing them by interfering with mitochondrial energy production. Rather than a so-called “Strangelove” ocean in which all life dies off, the study proposes a huge reduction of species richness—a decline in marine biodiversity of around 80 percent. Carbonate-associated sulfate isotope data compiled by the researchers demonstrates that widespread euxenic zones resulted in sulfide toxicity, driving the marine biodiversity loss during this period. Under low competition pressure, prokaryotic life rapidly occupied the resulting vacant ecospaces. It’s a remarkable portrait of biological productivity that contradicts the idea of an entirely dead ocean. The researchers note that this scenario also reinforces the idea that life forms influence seawater chemistry. The authors write, “This study also emphasizes that, besides the property of organisms to construct a habitable planet, they can also act as a catalyst for destruction,” noting that marine life would have been quite different with the flourishing of prokaryotes.Geologic data from the Early Triassic that followed records increased sequestration of sulfur sourced from pyrite owing to the lack of eukaryotic organisms that would have irrigated oceanic sediments with O2 via burrowing. These and other processes generated a negative feedback loop of the carbon cycle in which enhanced production and sequestration of organic carbon was stimulated by global warming and rates of chemical weathering. “The prolonged disturbance after the end-Permian mass extinction contradicts a fast return (<100 ky) to predisturbance climate and carbon cycle," the authors note.The authors conclude that post-extinction marine prokaryote domination, particularly the sulfate-reducing microbes, might have exerted enormous influence on the carbon cycle in the Early Triassic, affecting marine conditions and global climate, preventing the planet's recovery for a long period of time. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. An isotopic analysis of two mass extinction events Stratigraphy and geography. Credit: PNAS 2015 ; published ahead of print August 3, 2015, doi:10.1073/pnas.1503755112center_img © 2015 Phys.org More information: “Flourishing ocean drives the end-Permian marine mass extinction.” PNAS 2015 ; published ahead of print August 3, 2015, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1503755112AbstractThe end-Permian mass extinction, the most severe biotic crisis in the Phanerozoic, was accompanied by climate change and expansion of oceanic anoxic zones. The partitioning of sulfur among different exogenic reservoirs by biological and physical processes was of importance for this biodiversity crisis, but the exact role of bioessential sulfur in the mass extinction is still unclear. Here we show that globally increased production of organic matter affected the seawater sulfate sulfur and oxygen isotope signature that has been recorded in carbonate rock spanning the Permian−Triassic boundary. A bifurcating temporal trend is observed for the strata spanning the marine mass extinction with carbonate-associated sulfate sulfur and oxygen isotope excursions toward decreased and increased values, respectively. By coupling these results to a box model, we show that increased marine productivity and successive enhanced microbial sulfate reduction is the most likely scenario to explain these temporal trends. The new data demonstrate that worldwide expansion of euxinic and anoxic zones are symptoms of increased biological carbon recycling in the marine realm initiated by global warming. The spatial distribution of sulfidic water column conditions in shallow seafloor environments is dictated by the severity and geographic patterns of nutrient fluxes and serves as an adequate model to explain the scale of the marine biodiversity crisis. Our results provide evidence that the major biodiversity crises in Earth’s history do not necessarily implicate an ocean stripped of (most) life but rather the demise of certain eukaryotic organisms, leading to a decline in species richness. (Phys.org)—The Permian geologic period that ended the Paleozoic era climaxed around 252 million years ago with a sweeping global mass extinction event in which 90 to 95 percent of marine life became extinct. It would take 30 million years for planetary biodiversity to recover. Understanding the contributing factors of the end-Permian mass extinction is critical to understanding and perhaps mitigating the current anthropogenic climate change. Explore furtherlast_img read more

Producing turbulence in a BoseEinstein condensate yields cascade of wavelike excitations

first_img A disappearing feast: Mean flows remain slim after eating eddies Journal information: Nature (Phys.org)—A team of researchers at the University of Cambridge has succeeded in creating turbulence in a Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) and in the process, have possibly opened the door to a new avenue of research. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes how they achieved this feat and the evidence they found for a cascade. Brian Anderson with the University of Arizona offers a News & Views piece describing the work done by the team in the same journal issue and offers a brief overview of the characteristic distribution of kinetic energy in turbulent fluids. Explore further More information: Nir Navon et al. Emergence of a turbulent cascade in a quantum gas, Nature (2016). DOI: 10.1038/nature20114AbstractA central concept in the modern understanding of turbulence is the existence of cascades of excitations from large to small length scales, or vice versa. This concept was introduced in 1941 by Kolmogorov and Obukhov, and such cascades have since been observed in various systems, including interplanetary plasmas, supernovae, ocean waves and financial markets. Despite much progress, a quantitative understanding of turbulence remains a challenge, owing to the interplay between many length scales that makes theoretical simulations of realistic experimental conditions difficult. Here we observe the emergence of a turbulent cascade in a weakly interacting homogeneous Bose gas—a quantum fluid that can be theoretically described on all relevant length scales. We prepare a Bose–Einstein condensate in an optical box, drive it out of equilibrium with an oscillating force that pumps energy into the system at the largest length scale, study its nonlinear response to the periodic drive, and observe a gradual development of a cascade characterized by an isotropic power-law distribution in momentum space. We numerically model our experiments using the Gross–Pitaevskii equation and find excellent agreement with the measurements. Our experiments establish the uniform Bose gas as a promising new medium for investigating many aspects of turbulence, including the interplay between vortex and wave turbulence, and the relative importance of quantum and classical effects. Scientists have learned a lot about the nature of turbulence in fluids over the past several hundred years, some of which surrounds the way kinetic energy is distributed among components that have different momenta—which can be seen in action, as Anderson notes, by stirring cream into a cup of coffee. But until now, no one had succeeded in producing turbulence in a BEC, in which a gas of bosons is cooled to near absolute zero causing them to occupy the lowest possible quantum state, thereby allowing for viewing quantum phenomena—Anderson calls them “microscopic droplets of atomic gasses.”In this new effort, the researchers conducted experiments designed to discover what might happen if turbulence were introduced to a BEC, in this case, one made of rubidium atoms captured in a laser-created virtual box—this type of setup provided uniform density of the atoms. The team then applied a timed magnetic field that served to shake up the cloud of atoms, which added energy to the system. They then determined the momentum distribution. For small time intervals, they found most of the atoms in the cloud were in a low-momentum mode—more shaking pushed the atoms into a higher momentum mode. After approximately two seconds, the researchers found evidence of a cascade of excitations by releasing the cloud and capturing what occurred with a 2-D camera.The method used by the team to cause the turbulence in a BEC is likely to be used as a model for future experiments involving quantum turbulence.center_img Citation: Producing turbulence in a Bose-Einstein condensate yields cascade of wave-like excitations (2016, November 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-11-turbulence-bose-einstein-condensate-yields-cascade.html Gross–Pitaevskii simulations of a shaken, box-trapped Bose gas. The blue shading indicates the gas density; the red lines indicate vortices. Credit: (c) Nature (2016). DOI: 10.1038/nature20114 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2016 Phys.orglast_img read more

Study of European historical data suggests proportion of NO2 in NOx emissions

first_img © 2017 Phys.org One of the types of pollutants emitted by cars and trucks is nitrogen oxides (NOx), in particular NO2 and nitric oxide (NO). These pollutants have been in the news in Europe over the past couple of decades because many truck and car owners have chosen to switch to vehicles powered by diesel fuel, which costs less than gasoline—but such vehicles also emit more NOx. To combat air pollution, officials in Europe and the U.K have enacted emissions standards that have resulted in less NOx emitted into the atmosphere. But most such emissions have applied only to NO2, which has muddied the standards. Making things ever murkier—such standards have been based on the percentage of NO2 in total NOx emissions. This is because not only do vehicles emit NO2 directly, but NO turns into NO2 over time once released into the air. Now, it appears that the percentages that officials have been using to set their standards has been wrong.To get an accurate measurement of the true percentage of NO2 in the NOx being emitted by vehicles, the researchers analyzed data from roadside monitors across Europe. In looking at the data, they found that NO2 percentages had risen, as expected, during the period 1995 to 2010 (as people converted to diesel) but then as emissions regulations came into effect, the percentage of NO2 leveled off and has remained at those levels ever since. These levels, the researchers note, are roughly half of what is described by air quality policy, which suggests Europe may reach mandated levels sooner than thought. Gentner and Fulizi Xiong suggest the group’s finding could have also implications for developing nations as well because consumers there tend to buy used diesel vehicles from Europe. 5,000 ‘Dieselgate’ deaths in Europe per year: study Credit: CC0 Public Domain This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—A team of researchers at the University of York in the U.K. has found that the proportion of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in nitrogen oxides in European traffic emissions is smaller than has been thought. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the group describes analyzing data from roadside monitors over the course of many years and what they found by doing so. Drew Gentner and Fulizi Xiong with Yale University offer a News and Views perspective on the work done by the team in the same journal issue and suggest that the team’s findings could have implications for air pollution standards organizations in many more places than just Europe.center_img Journal information: Nature Geoscience More information: Stuart K. Grange et al. Lower vehicular primary emissions of NO2 in Europe than assumed in policy projections, Nature Geoscience (2017). DOI: 10.1038/s41561-017-0009-0AbstractMany European countries do not meet legal air quality standards for ambient nitrogen dioxide (NO2) near roads; a problem that has been forecasted to persist to 2030. Although European air quality standards regulate NO2 concentrations, emissions standards for new vehicles instead set limits for NOx —the combination of nitric oxide (NO) and NO2. From around 1990 onwards, the total emissions of NOx declined significantly in Europe, but roadside concentrations of NO2—a regulated species—declined much less than expected. This discrepancy has been attributed largely to the increasing usage of diesel vehicles in Europe and more directly emitted tailpipe NO2. Here we apply a data-filtering technique to 130 million hourly measurements of NOx , NO2 and ozone (O3) from roadside monitoring stations across 61 urban areas in Europe over the period 1990–2015 to estimate the continent-wide trends of directly emitted NO2. We find that the ratio of NO2 to NOx emissions increased from 1995 to around 2010 but has since stabilized at a level that is substantially lower than is assumed in some key emissions inventories. The proportion of NO x now being emitted directly from road transport as NO2 is up to a factor of two smaller than the estimates used in policy projections. We therefore conclude that there may be a faster attainment of roadside NO2 air quality standards across Europe than is currently expected. Citation: Study of European historical data suggests proportion of NO2 in NOx emissions smaller than thought (2017, November 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-11-european-historical-proportion-no2-nox.html Explore furtherlast_img read more

Warped diffusive radio halo detected around the galaxy NGC 4565

first_img Citation: Warped diffusive radio halo detected around the galaxy NGC 4565 (2019, July 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-07-warped-diffusive-radio-halo-galaxy.html Using the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR), astronomers have discovered a diffuse radio halo around the spiral galaxy NGC 4565. The finding, reported in a paper published July 16 on the arXiv pre-print server, could shed more light on the nature of NGC 4565, disclosing important insights about star-forming activity and the distribution of cosmic-ray electrons in this galaxy. Radio haloes are commonly observed around late-type spiral galaxies seen in an edge-on orientation. Studies show that the emission in radio halos is dominated by the non-thermal radio continuum component, indicative of cosmic ray electrons (CRe) and magnetic fields.Very little is known about the transport of cosmic rays in galaxies other than Milky Way. Low-frequency radio continuum observations have the potential to change this. They allow to investigate the oldest CRe far away from star formation sites in the halos of galaxies.So a team of astronomers led by Volker Heesen of University of Hamburg in Germany used LOFAR to conduct deep, low-frequency (144 MHz) observations of NGC 4565. Located about 38.8 million light years away, the target is a late-type spiral galaxy at an almost edge-on orientation. It is a quiescent galaxy with a low star-formation rate and an average mass surface density.”We have observed the nearby edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 4565 with LOFAR at 144 MHz in the radio continuum to measure the distribution of CRe and magnetic fields,” the astronomers wrote in the paper.During the observations, the astronomers detected a warp in the radio continuum of NGC 4565 that is reminiscent of a neutral hydrogen line (HI) warp and identifying a slight flaring of the galaxy’s radio halo. The researchers assume that this flaring is caused by the warp as the vertical intensity profiles are asymmetric, which is in agreement with the warp. According to the study, a minimum age for the warp was estimated at approximately 130 million years. This is the spectral age of the galaxy’s CRe, during which they are transported into the warp.Taking into account the results, the astronomers concluded that the NGC 4565 may be in the aftermath of a period with more intense star formation. They added that the galaxy has a relatively old population of CRe that has slowly diffused away from the star-forming disc.”The weak outflow that may be seen at higher frequencies was therefore probably stronger in the past, which explains the diffusive low-frequency radio halo,” the scientists wrote.Emphasizing that NGC 4565 could be in transition from an outflow- to an inflow-dominated phase, the researchers noted that this could explain why it behaves differently to NGC 7462, the only other galaxy in which they have detected a diffuse radio halo. They added that their research proves the significance of LOFAR observations for improving the understanding of cosmic rays and galaxy evolution. Hubble sees the needle galaxy, edge-on and up close Explore further © 2019 Science X Network NGC 4565: non-thermal radio spectral index between 144 (LOFAR) and 1570 MHz (JVLA) at 20 arcsec FWHM resolution. The major axis has been rotated so that it is horizontal. The size of the synthesised beam is shown in the bottom left corner. Image credit: Heesen et al., 2019. More information: Warped diffusive radio halo around the quiescent spiral edge-on galaxy NGC 4565, arXiv:1907.07076 arxiv.org/abs/1907.07076 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

The Feminine Fiesta

first_imgTime to step out and witness some extraordinary work by cluster of artists which is being displayed in the city. The group exhibition titled Spring 2014 showcase work of 21 women artists from different parts of India. All the artists have moved beyond oil paint on canvas or acrylics  and used mediums such as gold leaf, plastic waste, tie and dye with embroidery among others, to message their concerns and illuminate the world of pictorial art with insightful inputs. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The feminine form of Varsha Kharatmal’s, in vivid colours elaborate ornamentation, celebrate the joy of femininity, while the evocative self-portraits of Swapnil Srivastava emphasise the intensity of today’s women as a narrative in muted tones, and defined spaces, without being dark and oppressive. Motherly concerns, embodied through the Kaushalya-Rama form, is given resurgence in the colourful concepts of  Neeta Singh, and the protective tendencies of women are imaginatively wrapped in the depictions of Balwinder Tanwar, who articulates her idea through a pair of symbolic hands.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe graphic precision of Shruti Jain’s expressions incorporate spruce looks with intelligent composition whereas the deceptively simple mythical take on the Devi, as womanly strength behind the Purush concept acquires sophisticated aesthetic with Ritu Chopra.The work of Minal Rajurkar Shinde shows feline-canine-faced beings. Fertility finds adequate representation in the work of Nandini Pantawane, synchronising nature and women artistically. At one level starkly human and at another mythical, the etchings of Tejaswini Sonawane have an allegorical content expressed through otherworldly creatures and dominating postures. Compositional cohesiveness in Seema Gondane’s etchings have a powerful philosophy with the charming mesh of the whole uniting into a letter of close bonding. Rashmi Bawankar’s work comes with a mythical presence hovering above cityscapes, in a realm away from the grip of daily lives. The content of Rashmi Kachewar’s work surprises our imagination by its concentrated mass of form and empty spaces. Smita Kinkale uses solid forms like rubble and seeds to colour a distinct parallel geometry. Ashvini Jadhav, has patience, serenity and abstractions acquiresd into a fluid mass shown in her work.Viewing the colourful compositions of Jasminder Kaur in cocooned centric spaces, speaks of energies contained in a boundary, offset with a smart colour palette. Chitralekha Singh’s work celebrates the rhythm of life through a unique form. The tranquility of water is explored by Shyamali Paul who uplifts her lotus form from the swamp into a jewel effect. Alka Brushundi’s new approach to Tanjore art, embellishes its characteristics through unique placements and related subtleties.Where: Pearl Art Gallery, New Friends Colony, When: 14 April-10 May Timings:  11am-7pm (Mon to Sat) (Sunday by appointment only)last_img read more

The winwin situation

first_imgThe advertorial campaign done by Fusion Advertising on Voluntary Compliance Encouragement scheme (VCES), for the Central Board of Excise and Customs has won two of the most prestigious awards in the Ink Awards for Excellence in Newspaper Advertising viz.The Best Direct Response National Award is for effectiveness in communications . The eminent jury was of the opinion that the engagement campaign got into the shoes of the target audience engaged them and worked wonders.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The Best Copywriting Award which is significant as it is for copywriting across all categories-FMCG, Consumer durables, F & B, I.T, Retail, Telecom, Alok Jha, Additional Commissioner, Directorate of Publicity and Public Relations, CBEC and Shyam Bhargava, Managing Director, Fusion Advertising Services received the awards. They thanked the people and the Service Tax team for going ahead with the unconventional ideas. And added that without their approval, we could not have got the awards.last_img read more

Twinkling tales

first_imgThe solo exhibition titled We are made of stars by Sabya Sachi Ghosh depicts  the primordial nature of creation and a creative pictorial depiction of the universe. This exhibition that kicks off today is inspired by the resplendent starry sky on a moonless night. The theme of time travel is also touched upon. The works tries to bring about a feeling of an unbroken connection with time, since the moment of creation till out present state of its realisation. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’ We are all made of stardust. This statement is very poetic and has a tinge of a primordial nostalgia attached to this feeling. The search for the reasons behind our creation ultimately takes us to the very beginning of time. Rational explanations are then replaced with metaphysical definitions that aim to quench our longing to know the truth behind the creation of our universe. Religion in its own narrow way tries to convey a meaning that is very self oriented in a karmic manner. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe artist quotes, “When I gaze at stars twinkling in the night sky, I grasp the vastness of space and conceive of time as if it were matter and very tangible. My mind moves forward and backwards and is logical enough to haggle with a vegetable vendor. I am here stuck with this question; when we are capable of great thoughts why do we indulge in narrow selfish pursuits? Perhaps these ‘narrow selfish pursuits’ are our ways of preserving and continuing the progress of our species. I am not certain but for the lack of better ways we are as we appear to be.”When: January 23 to 29  Where: Open palm court Gallery, India Habitat Centre Timing: 10 am – 8 pmlast_img read more

Manager service boy arrested for serving food with dead cockroach

first_imgKolkata: The manager of a Chinese restaurant along with a service boy was arrested by Pragati Maidan police station for serving food with a dead cockroach to a family which had gone for dinner at the restaurant located on Matheswartala Road. According to police sources, the manager of the hotel Nanda Das (35) is a resident of G K Road in Tangra while Soumitra Jana (28), the service boy, hails from Matheswartala Road. The cockroach mixed food plate has also been seized by the police. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsA senior police officer informed that Rajat Paul, a resident of Bijoygarh under Jadavpur police station area, had gone for dinner at the bar-cum-restaurant along with his family at around 8.30 pm. They ordered various dishes going by the menu card and under the supervision of the manager, service boy Jana served them the food. They started taking the food and after taking a portion of it, Paul’s wife Satarupa found a cockroach mixed with the food. Even after the family complained about it and asked them to change the plate they allegedly misbehaved with them. A complaint was lodged and a case was initiated under Section 272 (Adulteration of food or drink intended for sale) against the owner, manager and service boy of the restaurant and the two were arrested.last_img read more

Mutual funds invest Rs 40000cr in debt markets during AprMay

first_imgMutual fund managers pumped in over Rs 40,000 crore in debt markets during April-May this fiscal primarily on account of improved business sentiments.This follows a fund infusion of nearly Rs 6 lakh crore in debt market in the last financial year. According to the Securities and Exchange Board of India (Sebi), fund managers invested net sum of Rs 17,389 crore in May and Rs 22,650 crore in April, taking the total amount to Rs 40,039 crore in the ongoing financial year. Also Read – I-T issues 17-point checklist to trace unaccounted DeMO cashIn comparison, mutual funds invested a net amount of Rs 13,420 crore in equities during the first two months of 2015-16. “After a spectacular past fiscal, we are upbeat about overall inflows in equities and debt markets for the current financial year (2015-16) as well,” an industry expert said.This inflow has helped the mutual fund industry to reach around Rs 12 lakh crore mark in assets under management (AUM) by May-end. Mutual fund is an investment vehicle with a pool of funds collected from investors to buy securities such as stocks, bonds, money market instruments and similar assets.last_img read more

Need to promote Indias art and culture

first_imgEminent practitioners of art and culture today spoke on the role of culture in development at the 88thAnnual General Meeting of FICCI on Saturday.Shovna Narayan, the ‘Kathak’ exponent said that art should be seen as a venture capital which helps in creation of uniqueness and identity for our country. She stressed on the preservation of art & culture the need to take its advantage in the most economical manner. “We are competing with the West, but we should strive to become centres of excellence and become focal points to act as magnets.” Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Prof. Rajeev Lochan, Director, National Gallery of Modern Art, emphasised the need for creation of space for interaction and exposure for the art and culture. He said that there is a need to create a platform for art where it can be utilised for the economic development in an effective manner. Going ahead, he said that adequate avenues have to be created for the healthy evolution of art and culture in the nation. He also mentioned that the art and culture in the country could benefit from CSR activities of companies.  .Sharon Lowen, ‘Odissi’ dancer, said that art has played an important role in the national integration of India in the post-independence period. She said that art gives Indian citizens an edge.last_img read more

Former HC judge Ashim Roy appointed new Lokayukta

first_imgKolkata: Former judge Ashim Kumar Roy, who was the Chairman of the West Bengal Clinical Establishment Regulatory Commission, will be the next Lokayukta of the state. The decision was taken unanimously during a meeting in the Assembly on Friday.Speaker of the Legislative Assembly Biman Bandyopadhyay, Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee, Leader of the Opposition Abdul Mannan and the Parliamentary Affairs minister Partha Chatterjee were present in the meeting. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeRoy, a retired Calcutta High Court judge, will be the second Lokayukta in the state after Samaresh Banerjee, who had served in the same post between 2006 and 2009. The post remained vacant since then. The West Bengal Lokayukta (Amendment) Bill 2018 was passed in the state Assembly in July this year, allowing the Lokayukta to investigate matters relating to the Chief Minister on the remaining 58 subjects under the state list, with the approval of two-third majority of the members in the state Assembly. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedMamata Banerjee had earlier explained in the Assembly that the Chief Minister is not at all out of the purview of the Lokayukta, apart from the matters “relating to public order”. Meanwhile, former judge Soumitra Pal, who was a member of the West Bengal Information Commission, will be appointed as the new chairman of the West Bengal Clinical Establishment Regulatory Commission. Raj Kanojia has become a new member of the Information Commission. Naparajit Mukherjee was given an extension as a member of the West Bengal Human Rights Commission. Mukherjee was the former Director General of Police. Incidentally, it may be mentioned that Justice Girish Chandra Gupta is the chairman of the West Bengal Human Rights Commission. The state Assembly was adjourned on Friday, after obituary references were made to some distinguished personalities from various fields, including politicians like the former Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee and former Lok Sabha Speaker Somnath Chatterjee. The Speaker also read out the obituary references of Pankaj Banerjee, Ranjit Kundu, Ram Kumar Mondal, Dinesh Joardar, Anil Basu, Ajay Chakraborty, Ajit Wadekar, Gopal Basu, Biswanath Dutta and Annapurna Devi.last_img read more

CESC sees huge surge in electricity consumption

first_imgKolkata: CESC is ready to welcome its 3.27 millionth customer by the end of this year.The corresponding figure in 2017 was 3.17 million, which means an addition of nearly 98,000 new connections in 2018. An analysis of this year’s CESC connections shows the average time taken to provide new power connection has been reduced substantially and it is now possible to get a new line within 24 hours. Take the case of Mita Mondal of Dum Dum, who was provided a new power connection on December 26. She had applied on December 18, 2018. Inspection by the CESC officials was done within a day and a bill sent to her place on December 20, 2018. She made subsequent payment and received her connection on December 26. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeAccording to Avijit Ghosh, CESC Vice President (Distribution Services), the number of electricity customers in the CESC areas have grown by more than 3 lakhs in the last three years. Currently, the fastest growing areas are Southern Kolkata, Howrah and Serampore. The maximum power demand successfully met by CESC this year was 2,131 MW on June 18, 2018, which is almost the same as last year’s maximum demand of 2,159 MW met by the company on 19 June 2017. In the meantime, the company’s resolve to reduce the restoration time of off-supply cases has received excellent response. According to Ghosh, another noticeable achievement is the reduction of off-supply cases, for which the average restoration time has been reduced by 21%. This year, not only were there lesser number of underground faults but average time taken for restoration has also come down by 12 percent.last_img read more

India Vetiver Network Jute Board to bring out lifestyle products

first_imgKolkata: India Vetiver Network along with Jute Board will produce lifestyle products that have tremendous export potential, said vetiver expert C K Ashok Kumar on Tuesday.He was addressing a gathering at the Artisan Speak and Jute Expo held at the renovated Old Currency Building on Tuesday afternoon. It may be mentioned that Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee has introduced Sabujayan, a project to prevent soil erosion in Nadia district by planting vetiver along the banks of the rivers. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeAshok Kumar said shoes and yoga mats made of jute and vetiver have tremendous export potential, particularly in Europe and America. Vetiver oil is in high demand in Europe. He said the export market of natural fibers is growing fast and geo-textile is coming up. Referring to history, he said Chola kings in South India used to plant vetiver to present soil erosion. A vetiver centre of excellence has come up in Tamil Nadu to create awareness among the youths to go for vetiver farming. About Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killed30 engineers are growing vetiver on 700 acres of land in the state. “We should tell our youths to not be job seekers, but be job givers instead,” he maintained. He said the India Vetiver Network will launch an awareness campaign all over the country about vetiver and its tremendous potential. It may be mentioned that over 75 nurseries to grow vetiver have come up in Nadia and room decorations made of vetiver are in high demand in Bengal. Sabujayan project is picking up in several districts and an aroma garden is coming up in South 24-Parganas.last_img read more

Delving into the world of Tigers

first_imgPaying a unique tribute to the tigers who have played the vital role of the ‘brand ambassadors’ of Indian wildlife, a book namely ‘A Decade with Tigers: Supremacy. Solitude. Stripes’, will be launched in the Capital on October 27.Tigers are symbols of the Indian wilderness and the mesmerizing stripes have long captured imagination of the people. ‘A Decade with Tigers’, written by Shivang Mehta, delves into the changing landscape of tiger photography in India, and contains expert opinions by leading nature photographers on the need for creativity and innovation in the photography. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe book is a photographer’s take on the dramatic rise in the popularity of tigers in the past decade and portrays the national animal in the most magnificent way. Owing to the increasing number of photographers taking interest in documenting the various moods and behaviours of the animal in forests across the country, the tigers have been anthropomorphised, with some of them becoming the ‘tiger icons’ of India.The volume chronicles legendary tiger mothers and male tigers of the past decade, as well as their tales of survival. These tales are complemented by exquisite images by wildlife photographer Shivang Mehta, who has spent thousands of hours on the field. Also showcased is the singular diversity of Indian wildlife through spectacular images of the myriad species that share their home with tigers. The animal is photographed in terrains, ranging from montane forests to the plains of Central India. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveA journalist turned PR professional, with experience in corporate communications, Shivang Mehta’s love of nature eventually made him leave the cosy comforts of the corporate office for the field. He is now an avid traveller and nature photographer. It is his love for the forests of Kumaon, that impels him to choose Corbett as his main area of work. Over the years, Shivang has conducted more than 200 field wildlife photography workshops and is currently an official trainer for Canon India, conducting such workshops in association with Canon across India, Sri Lanka, and Africa. Among the well known names, Valmik Thapar, Naturalist, Conservationist and Author, Ravi Singh, Secretary General and CEO WWF India, Rajesh Bedi, Wildlife photographer and Conservationist, and Mike Pandey, award winning Wildlife Filmmaker and Environmentalist, will be marking their presence at the event.last_img read more

State ranks No 1 in terms of women empowerment CM

first_imgKolkata: To commemorate the occasion of International Women’s Day, Chief Minister and Trinamool supremo Mamata Banerjee led a rally on Friday, organised by her party’s Mahila wing.The rally, which began at Shraddhananda Park at around 12 pm, continued with much fanfare as it traversed through the streets of North Kolkata, before it finally concluded at Dharamtala where she addressed the crowd. The procession which witnessed a footfall of thousands, was also attended by various women party leaders and ministers of the state including Chandrima Bhattacharya, Shashi Panja, Kakoli Ghosh Dastidar, Dola Sen, Smita Bakshi, Nayana Banerjee, Ashima Patra and others who walked along with the Chief Minister to mark the occasion. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseApart from a strong message on women empowerment, there were cultural programmes on the same theme that were performed by various women groups who also took part in the procession. Numerous placards highlighting the various state government projects such as Kanyashree, and Rupashree among others were also displayed at the march. While addressing the crowd at Dharamtala where the rally finally concluded in the afternoon after a long walk, the Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataChief Minister reminded people of the Women’s Reservation Bill for parliamentarians and said that her party is the only one in the country which has 35 percent elected women members in the 16th Lok Sabha. “While the Women’s Reservation Bill has not yet been passed in #Parliament, I am proud that our party @AITCofficial has 35% women MPs in the 16th Lok Sabha. We have also reserved 50% seats in local bodies for women candidates #IWD2019,” she tweeted on the occasion. “The party will ensure this happens and this is our commitment,” the Chief Minister said. Further contending that women of Bengal are the “backbone of the state”, she added: “Our state has done exceptionally well in all regards and it ranks number one in terms of women empowerment. “Bengal has 50 percent reservation for women in the Panchayats and municipalities. “We have increased child care leave for women to almost 730 days and have also instituted scholarships like Kanyashree and Sikshashree for students all across the state.” While speaking about the launch of the recent health scheme ‘Swasthya Sathi’, Banerjee said the smart cards which are being issued under the scheme are being given to a woman member of the family, recognising her as its head. Banerjee also added that a record 48 percent women have participated in the 100 days’ work scheme under the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act. The International Women’s Day is celebrated on March 8 every year as people unite to champion the advancement of women’s rights and gender equality.last_img read more

Can acting help improve memory

first_imgHave you ever felt annoyed with yourself, maybe for forgetting to do an important task?If so, acting out things you are supposed to remember or pretending that you are actually doing it, can help you recall.The findings showed that alternative enactment techniques, such as acting, can improve prospective memory – where you have not remembered to take the action you had planned. This involves recreating an action and pretending that you are actually doing it, in as much vivid detail as possible, the researchers said. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfA failing prospective memory can be an early sign of Alzheimer, according to lead author Antonina Periera, psychologist at the University of Chichester in the UK.In the research, published in the journal Neuropsychology, it was examined the prospective memory performance in nearly 100 participants. It included patients with mild cognitive impairment aged 64 – 87 years, healthy older adults aged 62 – 84 years and younger adults aged 2 –18 years.Participants reported improvement, especially the older subjects with mild cognitive impairment in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. It was confirmed that prospective memory erodes as we get older and that enactment techniques might support those with a poor prospective memory.The enactment techniques “can have long lasting effects even for people with cognitive impairment.last_img read more

Navras 2018 Paying tribute to the maestros

first_imgTo enthrall the music lovers, Ministry of Culture and Kalpana Verma of Kalahetu presented a soulful evening titled Navras 2018. The event was hosted in the loving memory of Late Praveen Gangani, the legendary Kathak dancer and Ustad Anis Khan Saheb of Delhi Gharana, who left us and the music world suddenly.”The changing moods of nature affect the psyche of the human mind and Saawan season is famous for its romantic ethos giving rise to different emotions and moods of Navaras. Keeping that in mind we have organized this soulful music and dance evening,” said Kalpana Verma, founder Kalahetu. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe evening started with the condolence ceremony of brilliant artists, Ustad Anis Khan and Praveen Gangani. Mukesh Gangani, son of the legendary Praveen Gangani showcased his father’s last choreography. The beautiful evening was then followed by a vocal recital by Ustad Iqbal Ahmed Khan Saheb Doyen and Khalifa Dilli Gharana. After this, the audience enjoyed an exhilarating presentation of Navras 2018.Navras 2018 with four major Rasas has been artfully conceptualized by Kalpana Verma with music by Pt. Jaikishen Maharaj. In the production of Navras, Kalahetu has roped in young and talented choreographers each handling a different rasa. Shringar Ras was choreographed by Vidushi Mamta Maharaj and beautifully performed by Vishal Krishna and Ragini Maharaj (Granddaughter of Pt. Birju Maharaj). Karun Rasa was beautifully performed by Vidushi Mamta Maharaj, (Daughter of Pt. Birju Maharaj).Adbhuta Rasa- a Kalpana Verma’s choreography was an imaginative depiction of the creation that never fails to amaze the artist. It was a gripping presentation by female dancers, Yamika, Geeta, Komal, Harshdeep, Deeksha, Sonali, Samadrita and male dancers including Rohit Pawa, Siddhant, Vivek, Anmol, Bhavdeep, and Montu.last_img read more